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RNS
McColl's Retail Group plc   -  MCLS   

Final Results

Released 07:00 18-Feb-2019

RNS Number : 2895Q
McColl's Retail Group plc
18 February 2019
 

 

 

Preliminary audited results and trading update

 

18 February 2019 - McColl's Retail Group plc, the UK convenience retailer, ("McColl's" or "the Group") today announces its preliminary results for the 52 week period ended 25 November 2018, and a trading update for the 11 week period to 10 February 2019.

 

 

Financial Summary:

·      Total revenue up 8.1% to £1.24bn (2017: £1.15bn1) reflecting the annualisation of the 2017 acquisition

·      Total like-for-like (LFL) sales2 down 1.4%, impacted by supply chain disruption, but showing an improving trend through the year, with Q4 FY18 sales flat and Q1 FY19 up 1.2% to date3

·      Continued progress towards our strategic target of increasing grocery and alcohol sales; now representing 34% of total sales (2017: 32%)

·      Adjusted gross margin4 26.0% (2017: 26.8%, 2018 gross margin 25.9%), reflecting supply chain challenges and mix effect of strong tobacco sales

·      Net cash from operating activities £61.8m (2017: £54.2m)

·      Adjusted EBITDA excluding property-related items5 £35.0m (2017: £44.0m).

·      Net debt materially better at £98.6m (2017: £142.2m)

·      Profit before tax £7.9m (2017: £18.4m)

·      Basic earnings per share 5.9p (2017: 12.3p)

·      Proposed final dividend of 0.6p per share, bringing FY18 total to 4.0p per share (2017: 10.3p)

 

Operational and strategic highlights:

·      Transition to Morrisons supply in 1,300 stores6 completed in mid-August, three months ahead of original schedule

·      Investment in estate continued with 59 convenience store refreshes completed in the year, delivering sustained average sales uplifts above 5%, and 11 new convenience stores added

·      Ongoing estate optimisation programme advanced with 66 under-performing newsagents and smaller convenience stores divested in the year

·      Banking terms revised, providing additional flexibility

·      Appointment of Robbie Bell as Chief Financial Officer; commenced role on 17 January 2019

 

Jonathan Miller, Chief Executive, said:

"2018 was undoubtedly a challenging year, marked by supply chain disruption following Palmer & Harvey's entry into administration and the accelerated transition to our new supply partner Morrisons.

 

"Despite this disruption, we continued to make progress against a number of our key strategic plans. We completed the rollout of 1,300 stores to Morrisons supply in less than nine months, which represents a considerable achievement and provides us with a more secure supply chain and a higher quality chilled and fresh offer. We also continued to invest in our estate, with 59 convenience store refreshes completed in the year and 11 new stores acquired.

 

"We are a profitable and cash generative business, and our priority for the year ahead is to rebuild operational momentum and we remain confident in delivering our strategic plans."

 

Current trading and outlook:

Early trading in FY19 has seen a sales improvement with total LFL sales for the 11 week period ended 10 February 2019 up 1.2%. Total sales increased 0.4%.

 

In FY19 we expect to acquire a small number of new convenience stores, and plan to complete 20-30 more convenience store refurbishments as part of our successful store refresh programme. We will continue to grow our convenience offer, increase our neighbourhood presence and give great customer service.

 

In line with the financial guidance previously disclosed on 3 December 2018, we continue to expect adjusted EBITDA for FY19 to be a modest improvement on FY18.

 

Notes:

The business uses a number of non-statutory or alternative performance measures (APMs) (for example, LFL, adjusted EBITDA, adjusted EPS and net debt) because management believe that these - placed with equal prominence alongside other statutory measures - help to better explain the underlying performance of the business and its key dynamics. These are kept under continuous review and are defined and used consistently, or explained otherwise. The Group has defined and outlined the purpose of its alternative performance measures, including its key measures, in the glossary of terms. Details of the £(2.6)m of gross (pre-tax) adjusting items are set out in note 3 and described in the financial review.

 

1 To better reflect the core operations of the Group, Post Office revenue, previously included in other operating income, is now recognised in statutory sales. In order to ensure comparability 2017 full year revenue, gross margin, gross profit and other operating income have been restated - see note 2.

2 LFL sales reflect sales from stores that have traded throughout the current and prior financial periods, and sales include VAT but exclude sales of fuel, lottery, mobile phone top up and travel tickets.

3 Q1 LFL sales to date are for the 11 week period ended 10 February 2019.

4 Adjusted gross margin is gross profit before adjusting items divided by revenue - see the glossary of terms.

5 Adjusted EBITDA excluding property-related items shows the Group's Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortisation adjusted for both property gains and losses and other adjusting items.

6 McColl's' total store estate is comprised of c.1,550 stores. The c.300 stores McColl's acquired from the Co-op in 2017 are under a separate supply contract with Nisa.

 

Results presentation

A copy of this announcement is available at www.mccollsplc.co.uk/investor.

 

A meeting for analysts will be held today at 9.30am at Numis Securities, London Stock Exchange, 10 Paternoster Square, London EC4M 7LS. Access will be by invitation only. All presentation materials will be available on our website.

 

Enquiries

Please visit www.mccollsplc.co.uk or for further information, please contact:

 

McColl's Retail Group plc

Jonathan Miller, Chief Executive

Robbie Bell, Chief Financial Officer

Naomi Kissman, Head of Investor Relations

+44 (0)1277 372916

Media enquiries:

Headland

Lucy Legh, Rob Walker, Charlie Twigg

+44 (0)20 3805 4822

 

 

Notes to editors

McColl's is a leading neighbourhood retailer, with an estate of c.1,550 managed convenience stores and newsagents. We operate McColl's branded convenience stores as well as newsagents branded Martin's across the UK, except in Scotland where we operate under our heritage brand, RS McColl. Our dedicated colleagues serve five million customers every week, and we are the largest operator of Post Offices in the UK, with c.600 in-store counters/branches.

 

Certain statements made in this announcement are forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on current expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from any expected future events or results referred to in these forward-looking statements. They appear in a number of places throughout this announcement and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations and those of our officers, Directors and employees concerning, amongst other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, growth, strategies and the business we operate. Unless otherwise required by applicable law, regulation or accounting standard, we do not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

 

Chairman's statement

A year of transition

It's been a challenging year as the McColl's team have navigated their way through unprecedented supply chain disruption. Having transitioned 1,300 of our stores to a new wholesale supply partner, the business can now look forward to rebuilding momentum and capitalising on the opportunities that lie ahead.

The business began the 2018 financial year with great confidence, having successfully integrated a major acquisition and signed a new wholesale supply agreement with Morrisons. However, just days into the new year we experienced a significant setback following the sad failure of Palmer & Harvey (P&H). The loss of supply to 700 stores created major disruption and required us to put in place an interim supply solution for nine months, during which we accelerated the transition of 1,300 stores to Morrisons supply.

Moving to a new wholesale supply partner, at a much faster pace than anticipated, created its own challenges and severely disrupted our plans for the launch of Safeway. We are working with our partner Morrisons and remain confident that together we can develop an optimal range and promotional offer for the future.

Strong cash performance and new financing arrangements provide flexibility

Whilst the considerable supply chain disruption we suffered held back like-for-like (LFL) sales and profit, the business continues to generate very strong cash returns. In the year, we have benefited from significant working capital improvements as we've transitioned to our new wholesale supply partner.

We have also realised proceeds from the sale and leaseback of a number of freeholds we acquired as part of our acquisition in 2017. This has allowed us to continue to invest in our strategic initiatives that will drive future growth, such as new store acquisitions and our store refresh programme, as well as pay down debt more quickly than anticipated.

In addition, in the second half of the year we engaged with our banking syndicate, and have amended our financing arrangements to give us more flexibility to execute our business plans.

Dividends

We need to give careful consideration to our cash allocation, striking the right balance between investing in the business, reducing our debt and providing returns to shareholders.

The Board is recommending a final dividend of 0.6 pence per share, making a total dividend for the period of 4.0 pence, as part of our commitment to provide returns to shareholders. This dividend will be paid on 6 June 2019, to shareholders on the register at the close of business on 26 April 2019, subject to approval at the forthcoming Annual General Meeting. Our policy of a 50% payout ratio to profit after tax (before adjusting gains but after adjusting losses) is unchanged.

 

Strengthening the Executive team

I'm delighted that after a rigorous and extensive search, Robbie Bell has recently joined the business as Chief Financial Officer. Robbie has over 20 years of finance and retail experience, most recently as CEO of Welcome Break, and previously in senior finance roles at Screwfix, Travelodge and Tesco. He is a great addition to the Board and as he settles into his new role I am confident that the business will benefit from his extensive experience and expertise.

We have made a number of additional senior appointments during the year, including Tim Fairs, our first Customer Director, and Greg Goodwin who joined us in the newly created role of Head of Buying. We are committed to bringing in commercially focused talent to support the business in the future.

I'd also like to thank Simon Fuller for the significant contribution he has made during his time as CFO at McColl's.

Looking forward

Jonathan and the team have shown enormous strength, determination and resilience in the face of immense challenges, and after an exceptionally difficult 2018 we begin 2019 with a more secure supply chain.

In the coming year, the business can move forward with a renewed focus on customers and the core elements of convenience retailing, to rebuild confidence and momentum.

Ensuring a strong balance sheet will be imperative and we will maintain good capital discipline, exploring opportunities to take further action to reduce our debt whilst maintaining appropriate levels of investment in the business.

Whilst it may take longer than anticipated to deliver the benefits of the Morrisons partnership this will be important to our continued transition to a food-led convenience offer. With the distribution network firmly established we can continue to enhance our offer, through further development of Safeway as we realise further value from the relationship.

Although Brexit and the current political environment continues to create uncertainty for businesses and consumers, food and grocery retail has a history of resilience during economic downturn and long-term social and lifestyle trends support growth in the convenience channel.

The Board remains committed to our strategy and, as we get back on track, we can look forward to a brighter future.

 

Angus Porter

Chairman

 

Notes:

Information regarding the Group’s assessment of risks related to Brexit can be found in note 1 and the principal risks and uncertainties.

 

Chief Executive's Review - Getting back on track

 

In approaching 30 years in the business I have never known a year as challenging as 2018. However, I couldn't be prouder of the McColl's team and how we have all pulled together in the midst of unprecedented supply chain disruption. We move into 2019 with a more stable and secure distribution network, and we remain a profitable, cash generative business. As we work to get back on track there are plenty of opportunities to grow.

We began the new financial year with the business in great shape. We had just surpassed the milestone of £1bn of annual revenues, with an improving sales trend and a strengthening product mix and margin. We were also excited to begin working with our new wholesale partner, Morrisons, and were making preparations for the launch of Safeway. However, just 48 hours into the year we received the sad news that P&H, the wholesale supplier to 700 of our convenience stores and newsagents, had entered into administration and deliveries would cease immediately.

In those early weeks, in the build-up to the busy festive period, we experienced significant availability issues as we established an interim supply solution with the help of our existing wholesale supply partner, Nisa, and our new partner, Morrisons. We are extremely grateful to both of them for their support.

Whilst we were able to largely ensure continuity of supply within a number of weeks, the interim solution was complex and more costly. It also diverted management focus from some of our wider strategic initiatives as we prioritised securing the supply chain.

Morrisons enabled us to re-establish tobacco supply within a week and agreed to accelerate the planned transition of 1,300 stores in 2018. This completed in August, three months ahead of schedule.

Setting up a national distribution network from scratch was an enormous undertaking and accelerating this process understandably created some operational issues which have impacted availability. This is improving week by week and we expect these issues to further improve as we move through 2019.

Prioritising the transition has also set back some of our wider plans including range development, and improving some of our cost prices. We are working together to develop an optimal range and promotional programme for our customers.

In the year, these supply chain impacts, in addition to the dilutive effect of a robust performance on tobacco, have weighed down on our gross margin, which has declined by 0.8%.

Increase neighbourhood presence

Following the major acquisition of 298 convenience stores in 2017, we resumed our single store acquisition programme. There is no shortage of opportunities, with around three-quarters of the UK's 46,000 convenience stores remaining independently owned.

However, given the challenges we have faced, we scaled back our programme, acquiring 11 new convenience stores during the year, and we expect to complete a small number in 2019.

Increasing our presence is also about fostering strong links with the communities we serve. Our neighbourhood locations and local colleague base provides us with regular opportunities to connect with customers.

In the last five years we have supported well over 500 local good causes, including scout groups, schools, hospitals and local charities. All of these have been chosen by colleagues and customers in our stores.

In addition, the recent launch of our social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram) is giving us new ways to engage with customers and get valuable feedback.

Growing convenience offer

We have taken an important step in growing our convenience offer with the launch of Safeway. The range of around 350 fresh, chilled and ambient groceries, and household products is now available in the majority of our stores and over time it will roll out to the entire estate. We are delighted with the quality of the products and customer feedback so far has been excellent.

We have seen good growth in a number of categories following the launch, including fresh meat and fruit and vegetables, but this has been offset to some extent by deflation as we've introduced lower price points on popular lines, such as eggs, microwave rice and soft drinks.

The accelerated transition to Morrisons supply led to a more rapid launch of Safeway than we had originally planned and constrained our ability to fully establish and promote the new range. As a result of this, and some challenges with availability, we have yet to see the meaningful increase in overall store performance that we would ultimately expect.

Despite this we have made progress towards our strategic target for grocery and alcohol to be our biggest sales category. It now represents over a third of our sales, and as we develop the Safeway range over the coming months we expect this to increase further. We are also commencing a full range review process, to respond to customer trends and get the most out of our newly established supply chain.

We have seen good growth in our average basket size which was up by 37p to £5.99. This was supported by the EUTPD2 regulations, introduced in May 2017, banning the sale of smaller packs of tobacco, and by growth in top-up shopping as we have grown grocery sales.

Food-to-go remains a small but growing category with lots of potential, as more meals are eaten outside of the home. We've extended our offer during the year and now have approaching 400 stores with a hot food-to-go offer and around 600 with a coffee unit. We now have 23 Subways trading, including the first of the new fresh forward concept.

Our store refresh programme presents a tremendous opportunity to grow our convenience offer and unlock the value inherent in our existing estate. During the year, we completed 59 refreshes, redesigning the store layout to provide more refrigerated space for chilled foods and new food-to-go fixtures. These stores support a broader range of convenience products and we are seeing sustained sales uplifts of over 5%. In 2019, we plan to continue with our refresh programme and expect to complete a further 20-30 stores.

Excellent customer service

Our biggest strength has always been our warm and friendly colleagues and this year has been no different. We continue to score very highly in terms of colleague friendliness and helpfulness, and their dedication and hard work has meant that in a recent survey we have improved on every single customer metric, despite the challenges of the last 12 months.

A great shopping trip at McColl's also involves access to a range of useful neighbourhood services. It is a growing part of our offer and customers are twice as likely to visit our stores for this reason. We now have around 850 internet collection and return points and we've cemented our position as the UK's largest operator of Post Offices. We've opened over 25 in the year and plan to open another 20 in the year ahead.

Following the completion of the transition of 1,300 stores to our new wholesale partner we are now refocusing on the core elements of neighbourhood retailing and prioritising what is most important to our customers. We have launched our Customer Champions - four characters that represent our four priorities - making sure all customers get a warm greeting, that our shelves are well stocked, that we highlight great offers and promotions, and that the shopping trip is quick and easy.

Driving efficiency and maintaining financial flexibility

Like all retail businesses, we have had to manage cost pressures during the year, the increase in the National Living Wage being the most significant. We remain focused on driving in-store efficiency and have made a number of improvements during the year, including the introduction of automated bake plans for hot food-to-go. We are also exploring new technological solutions. For example, we have recently introduced biometric scanners that monitor colleague time and attendance to ensure we can more accurately manage our payroll.

Cost pressures are expected to intensify in 2019, with a further increase in wage rates, energy inflation and an increase in our annual rent following our sale and leaseback activity. In light of this we continue to review our estate, assessing how future cost increases impact profit forecasts. During the year, we have closed or sold a number of underperforming stores and we expect to make further disposals in the year ahead.

We have completed a number of sale and leaseback deals on the freeholds we acquired as part of the major acquisition in 2017. The proceeds from these sales have helped to fund a number of strategic projects, including the store refresh programme and pay down debt to a significantly lower level than anticipated.

Whilst our existing financing is in place until mid-2021, to ensure that we maintain flexibility to execute our strategic plans, last summer we initiated discussions with our banking syndicate and a number of improvements have been made to the terms.

Looking ahead

Over the coming months the grocery sector will remain intensely competitive as we experience ongoing political and economic uncertainty making consumers cautious about spending. We will need to ensure that we manage cost pressures and maintain competitive retail pricing. But as we work through the issues we've experienced in 2018 there are exciting opportunities ahead. We remain confident in our strategy and will continue to enhance our convenience offer, through developing the Safeway range; increase our neighbourhood presence through stronger engagement with our communities; and continue to provide excellent customer service by focusing on the core elements of convenience retailing.

Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my colleagues at McColl's for their continued hard work and commitment.

 

Jonathan Miller

Chief Executive

 

Notes:

HIM! Convenience Tracking Programme 2018

 

 

Financial Review - A focus on capital discipline

 

Our financial performance in 2018 was inevitably impacted by the unprecedented disruption the business faced following the failure of a major supplier and the transition to a new wholesale supply partner. I am delighted to have joined the McColl's Board at this crucial time for the business. As we begin to recover from a difficult period we are focused on strong capital discipline and careful cost management to enable the business to rebuild momentum and return to sustainable value creation.

Annual revenue growth supported by 2017 major acquisition

Full year revenue grew to £1.24bn (2017: £1.15bn), an increase of 8.1%. This year-on-year growth was driven by the major acquisition we completed in 2017 which has added around 30% to our total sales.

Like-for-like (LFL) sales performance was impacted throughout the year by the supply chain disruption we experienced following the collapse of P&H and continued operational challenges as we established our new partnership with Morrisons. Full year LFL sales were down 1.4%, but improved during the year, with sales in the final quarter being broadly flat.

Across the industry tobacco continues to face long-term structural decline. However, it currently remains our largest category and we saw strong sales growth during the year. It was the most resilient part of our supply chain and sales were supported by significant inflation as a result of manufacturer and duty increases. Sales in our other traditional categories, principally news and confectionery, continue to decline as expected.

We have, however, seen good overall growth in a number of key grocery categories, including fresh food, bringing us closer to our strategic target for grocery and alcohol to be our largest sales category. It now represents 34% of our total sales, an improvement of two percentage points year-on-year, and from 27% before the major acquisition in 2017.

Gross profit margin impacted by supply chain challenges

With the evolution of our sales mix towards higher margin products we would typically expect to see an improvement in gross profit margins. However, adjusted gross margin has declined by 0.8% year-on-year to 26.0% (2017: 26.8%3, 2018 unadjusted gross margin 25.9%). This is partly a result of the adoption of temporary supply terms as we implemented an interim distribution solution and a robust performance on tobacco, which is a low margin category.

In addition, as Morrisons establishes its wholesale operation this has initially resulted in higher than anticipated cost prices on certain convenience lines. These are expected to improve during 2019 as we leverage and benefit from our joint buying capabilities and our partnerships with suppliers.

In terms of overall value, total gross profit grew by 4.5% to £321.1m (2017: £307.4m3), benefiting from the contribution of stores acquired in 2017. Within gross profit, partly offsetting the decline, is supplier income relating to both the wind down of a legacy contract and the transition to our new wholesale partner (recognised over the ongoing life of the contract).

Good cost management in the face of significant headwinds

We continued to face cost pressures during the year, the most significant being wage inflation as a result of further increases in the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage, which since inception in 2016 have resulted in 4-5% annual inflation in our biggest cost line.

We have kept good control of costs and in aggregate administrative expenses, before adjusting items, as a percentage of revenue, were broadly flat year-on-year at 25.1% (2017: 25.0%).

This has in part been supported by ongoing investment in systems and processes, for example, the introduction of colleague time and attendance technology.

In the face of continued cost pressures it is also essential to keep our estate under review to ensure that we maintain a sustainably profitable network of stores. We continue to enhance the quality of the estate through both the acquisition of high potential convenience stores and the planned closure or disposal of underperforming stores. During the year, we acquired 11 convenience stores and closed or disposed of 66 newsagents and smaller convenience stores.

Operating profit impacted by supply chain disruption and transition to a new supply partner

Other operating income decreased by £1.0m to £6.8m (2017: £7.8m3) reflecting a lower level of ATM cash withdrawals and lower commission rates in line with market trends.

Operating profit before adjusting items (see note 4 for definition), decreased to £18.3m (2017: £31.4m), impacted by the supply chain disruption and transition.

In total there were £(2.6)m of gross (pre-tax) adjusting items. This comprised £(14.5)m of costs and £11.9m of income. Net adjustments (post-tax) were £(0.8)m.

Adjusting items include £(1.7)m associated with the failure of P&H and £(4.9)m resulting from the set-up of our new partnership with Morrisons, which has now been expensed in 2018 rather than spread over the life of the contract. Included within this £(4.9)m cost is store set-up and merchandising, clearance of displaced product lines, new product establishment and other incremental store costs.

We also had adjusting items of £(0.6)m relating to pensions following the impact on our schemes of the GMP equalisation judgment made against Lloyds Banking Group and £(1.2)m of other adjustments, principally relating to fines for an historic health and safety incident and the cost of an HMRC ruling on minimum wage compliance.

In addition, we had £(6.0)m of costs associated with closures and impairment and a net gain of £11.9m in property profits following the acceleration of our sale and leaseback activity, which was materially larger in 2018 than had been anticipated. As well as releasing immediate value through this programme, the proceeds have allowed us to continue our capital investment programme including store refreshes, as well as reduce our net debt to a level materially better than expected. We expect the final tranche of sale and leaseback transactions relating to the major acquisition in 2017 to conclude in the first half of 2019.

Finance costs increased to £8.0m (2017: £6.7m). This reflects the increase in our average debt as we annualised the major acquisition in 2017.

Profit on ordinary activities before taxation decreased to £7.9m (2017: £18.4m). This was impacted by the £2.6m of adjusting items described above, alongside the impact of supply chain disruption on sales and gross margin, partially offset by transitional support. However, included within this profit measure was £6.1m of net property profits (being the combination of sale and leaseback gains, impairments and store closures).

 

Before adjusting items, profit before tax was £10.5m (2017: £26.3m).

 

Tax

The tax charge for the period decreased to £1.0m (2017: £4.2m), representing an effective tax rate of 12.9% (2017: 22.9%). The difference between the current statutory rate of 19.0% and the effective tax rate excluding the impact of non-deductible adjusting items of 26.6% in the period is due to the sale and leaseback and closure cost transactions, all of which are classified as adjusting items.

Earnings per share

Basic earnings per share reduced to 5.9 pence (2017: 12.3 pence). Adjusted earnings per share were 6.7 pence (2017: 18.3 pence).

Dividend per share

The Board has recommended a final dividend of 0.6 pence per share (2017: 6.9 pence). The total dividend for the period of 4.0 pence per share (2017: 10.3 pence), reflects our commitment to provide returns to shareholders. Our policy of a 50% payout ratio to profit after tax (before adjusting gains but after adjusting losses), is unchanged.

Improved payment terms drives an increase in current assets and liabilities

Total shareholder funds at the end of the year reduced by £4.4m to £141.5m (2017: £145.9m). This reflects a reduction in the book value of goodwill and other intangibles, property, plant and equipment by £7.4m to £345.1m (2017: £352.5m) following our store closure and sale and leaseback programmes.

Current assets at the end of the period increased to £147.7m (2017: £130.6m). This increase of £17.1m is a result of an increase in stock of £1.2m and trade receivables of £2.2m, plus an increase in cash and cash equivalents of £14.3. 

Our current liabilities increased to £220.8m (2017: £173.4m), reflecting higher trade and other payables as a result of our improved payment terms.

Non-current liabilities reduced to £144.7m (2017: £177.6m), reflecting reduced borrowings.

Pension schemes

We operate two defined benefit pension schemes, the TM Group Pension Scheme and the TM Pension Plan, both of which are closed to future accrual.

The combined accounting surplus (based on corporate bond yields) in the two schemes at the end of the period was £11.9m (2017: £10.3m), as a result of strong returns on assets.

The last actuarial review of the two schemes in June 2017 concluded that the combined funding deficit of our two pension schemes was £12.6m.

The Company currently contributes approximately £1.6m per year, inclusive of fees and levies.

Strong cash generation supports deleveraging and investment in strategic initiatives

Cash generation continues to support investment in our strategic plans, whilst reducing debt levels.

Net cash provided by operating activities increased in the year to £61.8m (2017: £54.2m). This was aided by the transition to our new wholesale supplier with more favourable payment terms, and proceeds from the sale and leaseback programme.

Adjusted EBITDA (see note 4 for definition), one of our key performance indicators, fell by £9.0 to £35.0m (2017: £44.0m), impacted by the supply chain disruption and transition.

We continue to invest in the business for growth, including our programme of store acquisitions and refreshes, alongside the development and extension of our services and food-to-go offer. In the period, alongside our acquisitions, we completed 59 store refreshes and delivered five new Subways in our stores.

 

After £26.3m of proceeds, predominantly from our sale and leaseback programme, net capital expenditure (which excludes the acquisition of stock), was £(1.0)m (2017: £20.3m).

Net finance expense of £8.0m was higher than the prior year, reflecting increased borrowings following the major acquisition that completed in July 2017. The interim and final dividends paid in the period totalled £11.9m.

Changes to banking terms provide flexibility

In 2016, we refinanced to support our major acquisition in 2017. This included a £100m working capital facility and a £100m repayment term loan. Both of these elements run through until July 2021, with the interest rate reducing as the business deleverages.

However, in light of the challenges we faced in the year, during the summer we initiated discussions with our banking syndicate to make a number of changes to the terms of our banking arrangements. These included increasing the covenant headroom and increasing flexibility in the facilities. All of these agreed changes will provide extra flexibility to deliver our convenience strategy.

Net debt at the end of the period was £98.6m (2017: £142.2m), representing 2.8 times adjusted EBITDA (2017: 3.2 times adjusted EBITDA).

At the end of 2018 the banking covenant on net debt:adjusted EBITDA was 3.0x and this is maintained throughout 2019, other than at the end of the first quarter when it is 3.25x.

At the end of the period, drawings against the total facility were £125.5m (2017: £154.5m).

Future outlook

In the short term, mitigating cost pressures will continue to be a priority. In addition to a further c.5% increase in the National Living Wage, we will need to manage significant energy cost inflation and additional rental costs following the sale and leaseback programme. To improve efficiency we are continuing to invest in systems and processes; alongside pursuing further estate optimisation. We have already taken some further action in the new financial year, including a head office and overheads efficiency review.

Alongside a strengthened balance sheet, rebuilding gross margin momentum will be our key focus.

I am very much looking forward to working with Jonathan and the team to further our strategic plans in 2019 and beyond.

 

Robbie Bell

Chief Financial Officer

 

Notes:

3 To better reflect the core operations of the Group, Post Office revenue, previously included in other operating income, is now recognised in statutory sales. In order to ensure comparability 2017 full year revenue, gross margin, gross profit and other operating income have been restated. Details of the restatements can be found in note 2. 

In December 2017, we received a fine of £0.6m relating to a historic health and safety incident following the installation of a ramp at one of our stores by a third party. Alongside the contractor involved, we take responsibility for this regretful incident and have taken a number of actions relating to contractor works, monitoring risk assessment, issue escalation and local training to ensure that the risk of such an event in the future is materially reduced.

The HMRC ruling relates to missed payment in relation to a number of colleagues opening and closing stores outside of scheduled working hours. We have recently introduced biometric scanners in-store that monitor colleague time and attendance to ensure we can accurately manage our payroll.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responsibility statement

 

The responsibility statement has been prepared in connection with the Company's full Annual Report for the period ended 25 November 2018. Certain parts of the annual report are not included in this announcement, as described in note 1.

 

We confirm that to the best of our knowledge:

 

·      the Financial Statements, prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as adopted by the EU, give a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities, financial position and profit or loss of the Company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole;

·      the Strategic Report includes a fair review of the development and performance of the business and the position of the Company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole, together with a description of the principal risks and uncertainties that they face; and

·      the Annual Report and Financial Statements, taken as a whole, are fair, balanced and understandable and provide the information necessary for shareholders to assess the Company's performance, business model and strategy.

 

By order of the board

 

Robbie Bell

18 February 2019

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Income Statement for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

Note

Adjusted

2018
£ 000

Adjusting items
2018
Note 3
£ 000

Total

2018
£ 000

Adjusted
restated

2017
£ 000

Adjusting items
2017
Note 3
£ 000

Total
restated

2017
£ 000

Revenue

2

1,241,539

 

1,241,539

1,148,747

-

1,148,747

Cost of sales

 

(919,003)

(1,428)

(920,431)

(841,370)

 

(841,370)

Gross profit

 

322,536

(1,428)

321,108

307,377

-

307,377

Administrative expenses

 

(311,442)

(7,118)

(318,560)

(286,889)

(3,730)

(290,619)

Other operating income

2

6,811

-

6,811

7,787

-

7,787

Profits arising on property-related items

 

416

6,109

6,525

3,110

(2,621)

489

Operating profit

4

18,321

(2,437)

15,884

31,385

(6,351)

25,034

Finance income

2

-

-

-

93

-

93

Finance costs

 

(7,859)

(158)

(8,017)

(5,200)

(1,521)

(6,721)

Net finance cost

 

(7,859)

(158)

(8,017)

(5,107)

(1,521)

(6,628)

Profit before tax

 

10,462

(2,595)

7,867

26,278

(7,872)

18,406

Income tax (expense)/receipt

5

(2,778)

1,762

(1,016)

(5,228)

1,014

(4,214)

Profit for the period

 

7,684

(833)

6,851

21,050

(6,858)

14,192

Earnings per share (pence)

7

6.67p

 

5.95p

18.28p

 

12.32p

Diluted Earnings per share (pence)

7

6.66p

 

5.94p

18.19p

 

12.26p

The above results were derived from continuing operations.

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Profit for the period

6,851

14,192

Items that will not be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss

 

 

Remeasurement of defined benefit pension scheme

859

3,039

Tax on defined benefit pension scheme

(150)

(517)

Total comprehensive income for the period

7,560

16,714

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

Note

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Assets

Non-current assets

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

8

92,314

103,565

Intangible assets

9

252,747

248,899

Deferred tax assets

 

97

172

Retirement benefit asset

 

14,122

13,609

Investments

 

36

36

Total non-current assets

 

359,316

366,281

Current assets

 

 

 

Inventories

 

77,146

75,965

Trade and other receivables

 

41,984

39,810

Cash and cash equivalents

 

28,547

14,273

Assets in disposal groups classified as held for sale

 

-

581

Total current assets

 

147,677

130,629

Total assets

 

506,993

496,910

Equity and liabilities

Current liabilities

 

 

 

Trade and other payables

 

(213,337)

(163,670)

Loans and borrowings

10

(2,148)

(1,799)

Income tax liability

 

(673)

(2,633)

Provisions

 

(4,627)

(4,508)

Liabilities directly associated with assets classified as held for sale

 

-

(830)

Total current liabilities

 

(220,785)

(173,440)

Net current liabilities

 

(73,108)

(42,811)

Non-current liabilities

 

 

 

Loans and borrowings

10

(124,989)

(154,722)

Other payables

 

(9,552)

(10,367)

Provisions

 

(1,042)

(593)

Deferred tax liabilities

 

(6,895)

(8,528)

Retirement benefit obligations

 

(2,250)

(3,352)

Total non-current liabilities

 

(144,728)

(177,562)

Total liabilities

 

(365,513)

(351,002)

Net assets

 

141,480

145,908

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

Note

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Equity

 

 

 

Share capital

12

(115)

(115)

Share premium

12

(12,580)

(12,579)

Retained earnings

 

(128,785)

(133,214)

Total Equity

 

(141,480)

(145,908)

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

 

Share capital
£ 000

Share premium
£ 000

Retained earnings
£ 000

Total equity
£ 000

As at 27 November 2017

 

115

12,579

133,214

145,908

Profit for the period

 

-

-

6,851

6,851

Remeasurement of defined benefit pension scheme

 

-

-

709

709

Total comprehensive income

 

-

-

7,560

7,560

Dividends

 

-

-

(11,862)

(11,862)

New share capital subscribed

 

-

1

-

1

Deferred tax

 

-

-

(127)

(127)

As at 25 November 2018

 

115

12,580

128,785

141,480

 

Share capital
£ 000

Share premium
£ 000

Retained earnings
£ 000

Total equity
£ 000

As at 28 November 2016

115

12,579

127,812

140,506

Profit for the period

-

-

14,192

14,192

Remeasurement of defined benefit pension scheme

-

-

2,522

2,522

Total comprehensive income

-

-

16,714

16,714

Dividends

-

-

(11,748)

(11,748)

Share-based payment transactions

-

-

436

436

As at 26 November 2017

115

12,579

133,214

145,908

 

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

 

Note

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Cash flows from operating activities

Profit for the period

 

6,851

14,192

Adjustments to cash flows from non-cash items

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortisation

4

17,054

15,636

Profit on disposal of property plant and equipment

 

(14,994)

(489)

Finance income

 

-

(93)

Finance costs

 

8,017

6,721

Share-based payment transactions

 

-

436

Income tax expense

5

1,016

4,214

Impairment losses

 

3,297

746

 

 

21,241

41,363

Increase in inventories

 

(737)

(20,924)

Increase in trade and other receivables

 

(1,593)

(3,969)

Increase in trade and other payables

 

48,082

40,561

Decrease in retirement benefit obligation net of actuarial changes

 

(906)

(1,633)

Increase in provisions

 

568

3,089

Cash generated from operations

 

66,655

58,487

Income taxes paid

 

(4,811)

(4,267)

Net cash flow from operating activities

 

61,844

54,220

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

Interest received

 

-

93

Acquisitions of property, plant and equipment

 

(21,295)

(25,655)

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

 

27,410

7,622

Acquisition of businesses, net of cash acquired

 

(4,513)

(122,409)

Net cash flows from investing activities

 

1,602

(140,349)

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

Interest paid

 

(7,928)

(6,327)

Proceeds from issue of ordinary shares, net of issue costs

 

1

-

Repayment of bank borrowing

11

(29,000)

(37,000)

New bank borrowing

11

-

154,500

Payment of finance lease creditors

 

(235)

(2,506)

Interest payment to finance lease creditor

 

(148)

(274)

Dividends paid

6

(11,862)

(11,748)

Net cash flows from financing activities

 

(49,172)

96,645

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

14,274

10,516

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

14,273

3,757

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

28,547

14,273

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

1

Accounting policies

Basis of preparation

The Group financial statements for 2018 consolidate the financial statements of McColl's Retail Group plc (the "Company") and all its subsidiary undertakings (together, "the Group") drawn up to 25 November 2018. Acquisitions are accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting.

The Group financial statements have been prepared on the going concern basis and in accordance with IFRS and IFRS Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) interpretations, as adopted by the European Union and with those parts of the Companies Act 2006 applicable to companies reported under IFRS.

The financial information set out above does not constitute the Company's statutory accounts for the years ended 25 November 2018 or 26 November 2017, but is derived from those accounts. Statutory accounts for 2017 have been delivered to the Registrar of Companies and those for 2018 will be delivered following the Company's Annual General Meeting. The auditors have reported on those accounts; their reports were unqualified, did not draw attention to any matters by way of emphasis without qualifying their report and did not contain statements under s498 (2) or (3) Companies Act 2006.

While the financial information included in this preliminary announcement has been prepared in accordance with the recognition and measurement criteria of IFRSs, this announcement does not itself contain sufficient information to comply with IFRSs. The Company expects to publish full financial statements that comply with IFRSs in March 2019.

Management have assessed the impact of the following newly issued standards.  IFRS9 will have no material impact on accounting policies or classification of financial instruments.  IFRS15 will have no material impact to the financial statements. IFRS16 is expected to have a material impact on the financial statements, this continues to be assessed and currently it is not practicable to quantify.

The consolidated financial information is presented in sterling, the Group's functional currency, and has been rounded to the nearest thousand (£'000).    The prior period was also a 52 week period.

The preparation of financial information in compliance with adopted IFRS requires the use of certain critical judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial information and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. It also requires Group management to exercise judgement in applying the Group's accounting policies.

The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgements about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

Going concern

The Directors have made appropriate enquiries and consider that the Group has adequate resources to continue in operational existence for the foreseeable future, which comprises the period of at least 12 months from the date of approval of the financial statements. The Directors continue to adopt the going concern basis in preparing the financial statements.

 

In November 2018, the Company signed an amended credit facility agreement, which provides improved headroom against the covenants. The updated facility consists of a £100m Revolving Credit Facility and an amortising £87.5m term loan (originally £100m initially being repaid at £2.5m per quarter). In addition, there is a £50m unsecured accordion facility available at the Company's option. At the end of the period, the Group had drawn down £125.5m (2017: £154.5m) of its facilities.

 

Following a disruptive year, the Directors reviewed the long-term forecasts covering all elements of income, balance sheet and cash flow. The Directors, taking into account these forecasts and the revised facilities available to the Group, continue to adopt the going concern basis in preparing the financial statements.

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

1

Accounting policies (continued)

 

In considering going concern, the Directors have assessed the possible impacts of Brexit on the business and specifically its financial covenants. These potential impacts could include a short-term reduction in sales, due to product shortages, pressures on gross margin and a higher level of cost inflation. The overall going concern scenarios the Company has modelled include assessing a 1% LFL worsening compared to plan, nil year on year gross margin growth despite anticipated product mix improvements and delays to the intended sale & leaseback programme. This review has been completed alongside a general consideration of the potential medium term impacts of an unfavourable Brexit.

 

As well as this, other scenarios have been modelled to consider potential shorter term effects, including looking at a more material sales reduction of approximately 11% in April and May and then 2% thereafter, as customers migrate to new products and/or supply chains stabilise. In both the short and medium term considerations it is expected that the majority of product cost inflation would be passed on to customers and therefore could be mitigated overall. Whilst in the short term the covenant headroom is tighter, having modelled these scenarios and the mitigating actions, the directors remain confident that the business is a going concern.

 

In the event of a far more challenging Brexit than the scenarios modelled or the business currently anticipates, there remain a number of further mitigating actions that could be taken, including significantly reducing capex and dividends and, for the most severe outcomes, reviewing our current arrangements with our supportive banking syndicate.

 

The Directors have made this assessment after consideration of various scenarios covering the sensitivity of assumptions and management actions to mitigate, and in accordance with the Guidance on Risk Management, Internal Control and Related Financial and Business Reporting published by the UK Financial Reporting Council in September 2014.

 

Alternative Performance Measures

In reporting financial information, the Directors have presented various Alternative Performance Measures (APMs) of financial performance, position or cash flows, which are not defined or specified under the requirements of International Financial Reporting Standards IFRS. On the basis that these measures are not defined by IFRS, they may not be directly comparable with other companies' APMs, including those in the Group's industry.

The Group believes that these APMs, which are not considered to be a substitute for or superior to IFRS measures, provide stakeholders with additional useful information on the performance of the business. These APMs are consistent with how the business performance is planned, reported and analysed between reporting periods within the internal management reporting to the Board. Some of these measures are also used for the purpose of setting remuneration targets and covenant calculations.

The key APMs that the Group uses include: adjusted EBITDA, adjusted profit before tax, like-for-like sales (LFL), net debt and adjusted earnings per share. Each of the APMs, and others used by the Group, are set out in the Glossary including explanations of how they are calculated and how they can be reconciled to a statutory measure where relevant. These measures have remained consistent with the prior year.

The Group makes certain adjustments to the statutory profit measures in order to derive many of these APMs. The Group's policy is to exclude items that are considered to be significant in nature and/or quantum. Treatment as an adjusting items provides stakeholders with additional useful information to assess the annual trading performance of the Group.

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

1

Accounting policies (continued)

 

Adjusting items

Adjusting items relate to costs or incomes that derive from events or transactions that fall within the normal activities of the Group, but are excluded from the Group's adjusted profit before tax measure, individually or, if of a similar type in aggregate, due to their size and nature in order to better reflect management's view of the performance of the Group. The adjusted profit before tax measure (profit before adjusting items) is not a recognised profit measure under IFRS and may not be directly comparable with adjusted profit measures used by other companies. Details of adjusting items are set out in note 3.

 

2

Revenue and other income

In accordance with IFRS 8 'Operating segments' an operating segment is defined as a business activity whose operating results are reviewed by the chief operating decision-maker and for which discrete information is available. The chief operating decision-maker, who is responsible for allocating resources and assessing performance of the operating segments, has been identified as the Board of Directors. The principal activities of the Group are currently managed as one segment. Consequently all activities relate to this segment, being the operation of convenience and newsagent stores in the UK.

The analysis of the Group's revenue for the period from continuing operations is as follows:

 

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000
restated

Revenue

 

 

 

Sale of goods

 

1,241,539

1,148,747

Other operating income 1

 

 

 

Property rental income

 

3,249

3,224

Other income

 

3,562

4,563

 

 

6,811

7,787

Finance income

 

 

 

Finance income

 

 

93

 

 

1,248,350

1,156,627

 

1 During the year management performed a review of all revenue streams. As a result of the review all income from Post Office will now be classified as revenue.  The reclassification of £16.7m from other income to revenue is the net income received as an agent in the transaction with the Post Office.  This has increased gross profit by 1% from 25% to 26%. The prior year's revenue has also been restated on the same basis and the value of this restatement is £16.9m.

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

3

Adjusting items

Due to their significance or one-off nature, certain items have been classified as adjusting, as follows:

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Cost of Sales

 

 

Supplier administrationa

807

-

Supply chain transitionb

621

-

Gross Loss

1,428

-

Administrative expenses

 

 

Fines & National Minimum Wagec

1,236

-

Supplier administrationa

935

-

Supply chain transitionb

4,306

-

 Defined benefit pension scheme - past service costd

641

-

Unprofitable store closure programmef

-

283

Co-op acquisition and integration costsh

-

3,447

 

7,118

3,730

(Profits)/losses arising on property-related items

 

 

Sale and leasebacke

(11,941)

 

Unprofitable store closure programmef

2,535

2,621

Impairmentg

3,297

 

 

(6,109)

2,621

Finance Costs

 

 

Co-op acquisition and integration costsh

 

1,521

Unprofitable store closure programmef

158

 

 

158

1,521

Tax effect on adjusting items

(1,762)

(1,014)

 

833

6,858

 

a. Supplier administration

The administration of P&H, our primary supplier to c.700 newsagents and small convenience stores, on 28 November 2017 created stock availability issues in store. To address this stock availability and to minimise disruption we entered into a short-term contract with Nisa, a short-term contract with Fresh to Store, brought forward the commencement of the Morrisons contract, and introduced a new supply chain solution for tobacco, via Clipper Logistics. As such, the Group incurred additional one-off costs, which are not reflective of ongoing costs and therefore management have classified these as adjusting items. This Resulted in a net cash outflow of £1.7m

 

b. Supply chain transition

As a result of the integration of a new supply partner, Morrisons, material one-off costs of transitioning were incurred.  These costs included £1.3m of additional payroll cost, £1.8m of marketing, £1.5m of store preparation, including costs associated with stock replacement and £0.3m of other costs. In line with the accounting policy for adjusting items, the additional costs incurred as a result of the transition are classified as adjusting items.  This Resulted in a net cash outflow of £4.9m

 

c. Fines & National Minimum Wage

On 22 December 2017 the Group was found guilty of a health and safety breach relating to contractor works at a store and subsequently a fine of £612k was issued to the Group. This was disclosed as a contingent liability in the Annual Report 2017. Following the completion of a HMRC National Minimum Wage investigation the Group was fined £227k and paid arrears due to colleagues of £397k. Each of these fines are fully paid. Management classify these fines as adjusting items due to the non-recurring nature. This Resulted in a net cash outflow of £612k.

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

3

Adjusting items (continued)

 

d. Past service cost

Management have classified the amount for Guaranteed Minimum Pension (GMP) equalisation as an adjusting item due to its non-recurring nature. In October 2018, the High Court ruled that Lloyds Banking Group will need to equalise pension benefits for the effect of unequal GMP between men and women, which dates back to 1990. The impact of the GMP calculation on our pensions was prepared following the C2 model. There was no cash impact from this adjustment.

 

e. Sale and leaseback

During the year the Group undertook a number of sale and leaseback transactions on its freehold property. In line with the accounting policy for adjusting items, management concluded that the profits relating to the sale and leaseback of property were significantly higher than prior years (2017: £3m) and therefore not in line with ordinary business and should therefore be treated as adjusting. This Resulted in a net cash inflow of £26.7m.

 

f. Unprofitable store closure programme

Management have undertaken an ongoing review of poor performing stores and have made the decision to close a material number of stores which are not economically viable to continue trading. The majority of these stores are either near lease expiry or lease break date. The closure programme consists of stores which have either closed in 2018 or will close in 2019. Management have adjusted onerous lease provisions, impairment, and other costs in relation to the closures. Provisions are discounted to their present value at the reporting date, giving rise to a finance cost as the discount is unwound. Any other closures costs which cannot be reliably estimated at present, may also be adjusting in 2019. Management have classified these as adjusting due to the one-off nature of the closure programme. This Resulted in a net cash outflow of £861k.

 

g. Impairment

Management have assessed the value in use cash flow of each branch against the carrying value of its assets, as a result of the impairment review an impairment charge was recognised in the year. Further information can be found in note 8. There was no cash impact from this adjustment.

 

h. Co-op acquisition and integration costs

On 13 July 2016 management entered into an agreement to purchase 298 convenience stores from the Co-op, for an aggregate consideration of £117m. The acquisition was approved by the Competition and Markets Authority on 20 December 2016. The acquisition was integrated during 2017 by Martin McColl Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Group. The adjusting costs relate to legal fees, sponsor fees, implementation costs and finance costs. All 298 stores were successfully transitioned by 13 July 2017. There was no cash impact from this adjustment in the current year.

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

4

Operating profit

Arrived at after charging/(crediting)

 

Note

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Depreciation and amortisation expense

 

17,054

15,636

Write-down of inventory recognised as an expense

 

16,471

13,766

Operating lease expense - property

 

35,868

33,810

Profit on disposal of property, plant and equipment

 

(12,150)

(489)

Impairment

8

3,297

746

Cost of inventories recognised as an expense

 

951,073

876,599

 

Adjusted EBITDA and operating profit excluding property-related items

In order to provide shareholders with a measure of the underlying performance of the business which is more aligned with the way that management monitor and manage the business, the Group makes adjustments to profit before tax. Adjusting items relate to costs or incomes that derive from events or transactions that fall within the normal activities of the Group, but which are excluded from the Group's adjusted profit before tax measure due to their size and nature in order to better reflect management's view of the performance of the Group.  The adjusted profit before tax measure (profit before adjusting items) is not a recognised profit measure under IFRS and may not be directly comparable with adjusted profit measures used by other companies. Details of adjusting items are set out in note 3.

 

 

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Adjusted EBITDA excluding property related items

Operating profit before adjusting items

 

18,321

31,385

Depreciation and amortisation

 

17,054

15,289

Profits arising on property-related items

 

(416)

(3,110)

Share-based payments

 

-

436

 

 

34,959

44,000

Adjusted operating profit excluding property related items

Operating profit before adjusting items

 

18,321

31,385

Less: Profits arising on property-related items

 

(416)

(3,110)

 

 

17,905

28,275

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

5

Income tax

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Income statement

Current tax :

Current tax on profit for the period

2,858

4,780

Adjustments in respect of prior periods

(7)

(173)

 

2,851

4,607

Deferred tax :

Origination and reversal of temporary differences

(2,123)

(81)

Arising from change in tax rate

234

(14)

Adjustments in respect of prior periods

54

(298)

 

(1,835)

(393)

Income tax expense for the period

1,016

4,214

Equity items

 

 

Share-based payment

92

-

Fixed assets

35

-

 

127

 

Other comprehensive income

Deferred tax in respect of actuarial valuation of retirement benefits

150

517

       

 

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 017 to 25 November 2018

5

Income tax (continued)

 

The differences are reconciled below:

 

2018
£ 000

(As restated)
2017
£ 000

Profit before tax

7,867

18,406

Tax on profit calculated at standard rate for 2018 of 19.00% (2017: 19.33%)

1,495

3,558

Income not taxable

-

(8)

Expenses not deductible

817

650

Deferred tax on share options

55

(18)

Adjustments in respect of prior years

47

(471)

Arising from change in rate of tax

234

(14)

Exempt amounts1

605

517

Disposal of business combination assets

(2,237)

-

Total tax charge

1,016

4,214

 

1Include finance leases, land and buildings in use and disposal rebates against assets.

Changes to the UK corporation tax rates were enacted as part of Finance Bill 2016 on 6 September 2016. This included reductions to the main rate to reduce the rate to 17% from 1 April 2020.

 

The tax charge for the 52 week period was £1,016,000 (2017: £4,214,000) representing a rate of 12.9% (2017: 22.9%). The comparable effective rate of tax in 2018 excluding the impact of non-deductible adjusting items was 26.6% (2017: 19.9%). The difference between the current and statutory rate of 19.0% in the period is due principally to the sale and leaseback and closure cost transactions, all of which are classified as adjusting items, see note 3 for further information.

 

Amounts recognised in other comprehensive income:

 

2018

2017

 

Before tax
£ 000

Tax (expense)

 /benefit
£ 000

 

 

Net of tax
£ 000

Before tax
£ 000

Tax (expense) /benefit
£ 000

 

 

Net of tax
£ 000

Remeasurements of post employment benefit obligations

859

(150)

709

3,039

(517)

2,522

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

6

Dividends

 

2018

2017

 

£ 000

£ 000

Interim 2018 dividend of 3.40p (2017: 3.40p) per ordinary share

3,916

3,916

Final 2017 dividend of 6.90p (2016: 6.80p) per ordinary share

7,946

7,832

 

11,862

11,748

       

 

The Directors are proposing a final 2018 dividend of 0.6 pence (2017: 6.90 pence) per share totalling £691,000 (2017: £7,946,000).

 

The proposed final dividend is subject to approval by shareholders passing a written resolution and accordingly has not been included as a liability in these financial statements.

7

Earnings per share

Basic and diluted earnings per share are calculated by dividing the profit for the period attributable to shareholders by the weighted average number of shares.

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Basic weighted average number of shares

115,173,145

115,172,774

Diluted weighted average number of shares

115,331,969

115,724,645

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders (£'000)

6,851

14,192

Basic earnings per share

5.95p

12.32p

Diluted earnings per share

5.94p

12.26p

Adjusted earnings per share:

 

 

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders (£'000)

6,851

14,192

Adjusting items (note 3)

2,595

7,872

Tax effect of adjustments

(1,762)

(1,014)

Profit after tax and before adjusting items

7,684

21,050

 

 

 

Basic adjusted earnings per share

6.67p

18.28p

Diluted adjusted earnings per share

6.66p

18.19p

 

The difference between the basic and diluted average number of shares represents the dilutive effect of share options in existence.

 

The diluted weighted average number of ordinary shares is calculated as follows:

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Ordinary shares in issue at the start of the period

115,172,774

108,505,494

Effect of shares issued for the Co-op acquisition (full year)

-

6,667,280

Effects of shares issued during the period

741

-

Total shares in issue at the end of the year

115,173,515

115,172,774

Effect of shares to be issued for the long term incentive plan (LTIP)

158,825

551,871

Weighted average number of ordinary shares at the end of the period

115,332,340

115,724,645

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

8

Property, plant and equipment

 

 

Land and buildings
£ 000

Furniture, fittings and equipment
£ 000

Total
£ 000

Cost or valuation

At 28 November 2016

34,679

90,406

125,085

Additions

8,727

15,981

24,708

Acquired through business combinations

29,839

4,410

34,249

Classified as held for sale

-

3,044

3,044

Disposals

(5,242)

(3,690)

(8,932)

At 26 November 2017

68,003

110,151

178,154

At 27 November 2017

68,003

110,151

178,154

Additions

5,849

13,968

19,817

Acquired through business combinations

726

1,314

2,040

Disposals

(15,473)

1,429

(14,044)

Transfers to software

(1,133)

-

(1,133)

At 25 November 2018

57,972

126,862

184,834

Depreciation

At 28 November 2016

13,116

45,186

58,302

Charge for period

4,235

10,761

14,996

Disposals

(274)

(1,525)

(1,799)

Impairment

-

746

746

Classified as held for sale

-

2,344

2,344

At 26 November 2017

17,077

57,512

74,589

At 27 November 2017

17,077

57,512

74,589

Charge for the period

4,678

11,678

16,356

Disposals

(349)

(1,279)

(1,628)

Impairment

-

3,297

3,297

Transfers to software

(94)

-

(94)

At 25 November 2018

21,312

71,208

92,520

Carrying amount

At 25 November 2018

36,660

55,654

92,314

At 26 November 2017

50,926

52,639

103,565

 

 

 

 

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

8

Property, plant and equipment (continued)

During the year the Group disposed of property in sale and leaseback transactions, the net book value of these properties at disposal was £13,855,000.

 

Included within fixture and fittings is £2,755,000 of finance lease assets.

 

For impairment testing the Group classes each branch as a CGU (cash generating unit). Each CGU was tested for impairment at the period end date. Management recognise an impairment where the recoverable amount of the CGU does not exceed its carrying value at the balance sheet date.  Recoverable amounts for CGUs are the higher of fair value less costs of disposal, and value in use.

 

The key assumptions for the value in use calculation include the discount rate, long-term growth rates and forecast cash flows. The value in use calculations use forecast cash flows taking into account actual performance for the year and the Group's cash flow forecast for a three-year period, which has been approved by management. Cash flows beyond this period are extrapolated using a long-term growth rate of nil and discounted with a weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of 11.75% (2017: 8.9%). The change in WACC is driven by a decrease in share price and reduction in borrowings.

 

The discount rate is based on the Group's weighted average cost of capital, taking into account the cost of capital and borrowings, to which specific market-related premium adjustments are made.

 

Management extrapolated the cash flows to perpetuity with a growth rate of nil as this was considered to be a prudent basis.  In assessing the EBITDA sensitivities, we have also considered the potential downside from Brexit and related mitigation, the impact of which would not affect the carrying values. Further detail of our considerations and sensitivities are included within going concern assessment in our accounting policies.

 

The annual impairment testing resulted in an impairment charge of £3,297,000 against branch assets.

 

 

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

9

Intangible assets

 

 

Goodwill
£ 000

Other intangible assets
£ 000

Total
£ 000

Cost or valuation

At 28 November 2016

157,292

5,872

163,164

Additions

91,442

929

92,371

Fair value adjustment for goodwill

(560)

-

(560)

Deferred tax on fair value adjustment of land and buildings

3,377

-

3,377

At 26 November 2017

251,551

6,801

258,352

At 27 November 2017

251,551

6,801

258,352

Additions

2,029

1,478

3,507

Transfers from PPE

-

1,133

1,133

At 25 November 2018

253,580

9,412

262,992

Amortisation

At 28 November 2016

4,234

4,579

8,813

Amortisation charge

-

640

640

At 26 November 2017

4,234

5,219

9,453

At 27 November 2017

4,234

5,219

9,453

Amortisation charge

-

698

698

Transfers from PPE

-

94

94

At 25 November 2018

4,234

6,011

10,245

Carrying amount

At 25 November 2018

249,346

3,401

252,747

At 26 November 2017

247,317

1,582

248,899

 

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

9

Intangible assets (continued)

Software includes £1,391,000 of internally generated development costs.

 

Transfers in the year relate to the reallocation of IT development costs, previously classified within tangible assets.

 

Amortisation expenses of £698,000 (2017: £640,000) are included in administrative expenses.

 

Goodwill acquired in a business combination is not amortised, but is reviewed for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if there are indications that goodwill may be impaired.  Management recognise an impairment where the recoverable amount of the CGU does not exceed the carrying value of goodwill. For the purpose of Goodwill, in line with the accounting policy, the business manages and makes decisions as one group of CGUs and therefore impairment is assessed on that single group. The recoverable amount of the CGU is determined from value in use calculations with a discounted cash flow model used to calculate this amount. Management has determined the values assigned to each of the key assumptions.

 

The key assumptions for the value in use calculation include the discount rate, long-term growth rates and forecast cash flows. The value in use calculations use forecast cash flows taking into account actual performance for the year and the Group's cash flow forecast for a three-year period, which has been approved by management. Cash flows beyond this period are extrapolated using a long-term growth rate of nil and discounted with a weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of 11.75% (2017: 8.9%). The change in WACC is driven by a decrease in share price and reduction in borrowings.

 

The discount rate is based on the Group's weighted average cost of capital, taking into account the cost of capital and borrowings, to which specific market-related premium adjustments are made.

 

Management extrapolated the cash flows to perpetuity with a growth rate of nil as this was considered to be a prudent basis. In assessing the EBITDA sensitivities, we have also considered the potential downside from Brexit and related mitigation, the impact of which would not affect the carrying value. Further detail of our considerations and sensitivities are included within going concern assessment in our accounting policies.

 

Upon review of impairment, management have calculated the recoverable amount and it exceeds the carrying amount and therefore have not included an impairment charge.

 

Significant estimates

 

Change in discount rate

The Group has conducted sensitivity analysis on the impairment testing for goodwill. With reasonable possible changes in key assumptions including a 2 percentage point change in WACC, management have concluded that the carrying amount of goodwill would be likely to exceed the value in use.

 

Growth rate

Management have assumed a long term growth rate to perpetuity after three years of nil, which is considered a prudent basis. The growth rate in the next three years is based on managements expectation of sales growth.

 

Budgeted cash flows

Management have conducted sensitivity analysis on the CGUs VIU by reducing the anticipated future cash flows.  A reduction of 2.2% in forecast cash flows would reduce the headroom to nil.

 

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

10

 Loans and borrowings

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Current

 

 

Finance lease liabilities

2,148

1,799

 

2,148

1,799

Non-current loans and borrowings

Bank borrowings

125,500

154,500

Unamortised issue costs

(1,458)

(1,532)

Finance lease liabilities

947

1,754

 

124,989

154,722

       

 

The long term loans are secured by a fixed charge over the Group's head office property together with a floating charge over the Group's assets.

 

In November 2018, the Group amended some of the terms of the existing facility. The Group has an amortising £87,500,000 term loan and a £100,000,000 revolving facility with a £50,000,000 accordion. The current facility drawn as at 25 November 2018 is £125,500,000 (2017: £154,500,000).

 

Details of loans and hire purchase obligations repayable within two to five years are as follows:

 

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Term Loan and revolving facility available until July 2021

125,500

154,500

Finance lease liabilities

947

1,754

 

126,447

156,254

11

 Net debt

 

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Cash at bank and in hand

 

28,547

14,273

 

 

28,547

14,273

Term loan and revolving facility available until July 2021

 

(125,500)

(154,500)

Less: unamortised issue costs

 

1,458

1,532

 

 

(124,042)

(152,968)

Amounts due under finance lease obligations

 

(3,095)

(3,552)

Net debt

 

(98,590)

(142,247)

         

Analysis of net debt

 

2017
£ 000

Cash flow
£ 000

Other non-cash movements
£ 000

2018
£ 000

Cash and short-term deposits

14,273

14,274

-

28,547

 

14,273

14,274

-

28,547

Bank borrowings

(152,968)

29,000

(74)

(124,042)

Finance lease liabilities

(3,552)

457

-

(3,095)

 

(156,520)

29,457

(74)

(127,137)

 

43,731

(74)

(98,590)

 

McColl's Retail Group

Notes to the Financial Statements for the 52 week Period from 27 November 2017 to 25 November 2018

12

 Authorised, issued and fully paid share capital

 

Number of ordinary shares

0.1 pence each

Share capital
£ 000

Share premium
£ 000

At 28 November 2017

115,172,774

115

12,579

Shares issued during the period

741

-

1

At 25 November 2018

115,173,515

115

12,580

         

The Board has authorised the allotment of shares equal to the nominal value of £77,000.

 

The Company has one class of ordinary shares which carry no right to fixed income. All issued shares are fully paid.

 

The Group did not acquire any of its own shares for cancellation in the 52 weeks ending 25 November 2018 or 52 weeks ending 26 November 2017.

 

The shares rank equally for voting purposes. On a show of hands each shareholder has one vote and on a poll each shareholder has one vote per ordinary share held. Each ordinary share ranks equally for any dividend declared. Each ordinary share ranks equally for any distributions made on a winding up of the Group. Each ordinary share ranks equally in the right to receive a relative proportion of shares in the event of a capitalisation of reserves.

13

 Related party transactions

Only the Directors are deemed to be key management personnel. All transactions between Directors and the Group are on an arm's length basis and no period end balances have arisen as a result of these transactions.

 

2018
£ 000

2017
£ 000

Salaries and other short term employee benefits

1,917

1,793

Share-based payments

29

228

 

1,946

2,021

 

There were no material transactions or balances between the Group and its key management personnel or members of their close family.

 

 

 

 

Principal Risks and Uncertainties

 

We are committed to good corporate governance. To this end, we follow a sound risk management process closely aligned to our strategy.

 

At present, the Board, with the assistance of the Audit & Risk Committee, considers the following to be the principal risks facing the Group.

 

Principal Risk

Risk

Mitigation/Strategic response

Current changes

Strategy

(maintained)

If the Board either adopts the wrong strategy or does not implement it effectively the aims of the business, its performance and reputation may suffer.

·      Our strategic development is led by an experienced Board and Senior Management

·      An annual strategic review takes place alongside our budget-setting process

·      The McColl's strategy is widely communicated and understood across the business

·      Business plans are developed, monitored and reviewed against strategic KPIs

·      Senior Management are incentivised with performance-related rewards to deliver our strategic goals

Key strategic challenges for 2019 include the continuing work to deliver the supply chain benefits from our partnership with Morrisons and further developing our convenience offer. Ongoing change and consolidation in the sector may also impact our business and require us to adjust our strategy accordingly.

 

Competition

(increased)

We operate in a highly competitive environment, which is continually changing and has been subject to ongoing consolidation. Failure to maintain market share could have an adverse effect on our core business.

·      We monitor competitor activity and customer trends

 

·      Regular meetings are held with key suppliers to optimise our offer

 

·      We are increasing brand awareness through marketing

 

·      Improvement of our estate and stores is ongoing

 

·      Local refit programmes are undertaken to counter specific competitive threats

 

·      We have launched the Safeway brand in store to differentiate our offer

 

·      We have increased our marketing ad campaigns and seasons events, both in store and through local advertising

We will work through individual category reviews to ensure our offer, range

and price is competitive. Our ongoing store refresh programme will enhance our customers' shopping experience.

Customer Offer

(maintained)

Customer shopping habits are influenced by a wide range of factors. If we do not respond to their changing needs they are more likely to shop with a competitor, resulting

in falling revenues.

·      Membership of third party organisations (such as the Association of Convenience Stores) gives us greater insight into the convenience channel trends and developments

·      Our Customer Director has enhanced the Retail Board's capability to address changing customer needs

·      Promotional programmes offer customers great value

·      Our strong customer service standards are reflected in our evolving brand strategy

·      We complete detailed customer research for key projects, for example our store refurbishment programme

·      We have launched our presence in social media to better engage with customers

Working with our new supply partner we will focus on the breadth and depth of our offer, particularly in key categories such as fresh & chilled food. We will also look to broaden our seasonal relevance e.g. in non-food areas

Supply chain

(increased)

We rely on a small number of key distributors and may be adversely affected by changes in supplier dynamics and interruptions in supply.

·      We establish long-term relationships with trusted suppliers

·      Our distribution partners maintain their own contingency planning as do we

·      We closely monitor supplier performance including service levels and hold regular discussions with them to address any issues (with contractual protections in place)

·      We monitor the financial stability of key partners

·      We regularly review our supply chain arrangements, with full tenders completed in 2013 and 2017

·      We have a flexible electronic ordering process, with established links to the key UK wholesalers

·      Our supply chain partner, Morrisons, is undertaking significant pre-Brexit planning (including becoming an authorised economic operator)

The collapse of P&H in November 2017 tested our contingency arrangements as did the accelerated transition to Morrisons supply in 2018. Going forwards into 2019 it is important to fully stabilise and then optimise arrangements, including responding to the outcomes of Brexit.

Supply chain transition

(increased)

During 2018, we transitioned the wholesale arrangements for the majority of our estate to a new supplier. The accelerated timeline introduced additional complexity and risk.

·      There is close oversight by the Retail Board and Senior Management

·      We undertook a significant amount of planning and testing work to identify and resolve potential issues and have instigated close monitoring of performance

·      We have a dedicated and skilled management team with extensive experience of managing supply arrangements

·      We have established clear lines of communication and a joint project management approach with our new supplier

·      The final phase of the transition will, in due course, incorporate all of the learnings from 2018

·      Transitional support has been provided by our new wholesale partner

Issues relating to availability, product set up and cost prices are being worked through with suppliers and our new wholesale partner. We expect to exit 2019 with an improved trajectory.

Economy

(maintained)

All our revenue is generated in the UK.

Any deterioration in the UK economy, for example as a consequence of Brexit, could affect consumer spending and cost of goods, which in turn would impact our sales and profitability.

·      We sell food and household essentials which are not considered to be highly discretionary

·      We offer a wide range of products at different price points, e.g. value and premium brands

·      Our flexible business model allows us to respond to changes in customer behaviour, for example, by adapting our ranges

·      We are growing our range of own brand products through the rollout of Safeway

·      We are working with supply partners and manufacturers to build our Brexit contingency plans

As the impacts of Brexit on the UK economy become clearer we will continue to evolve our strategy to mitigate any impacts. We have modelled various scenarios to ensure we have sufficient mitigation options.

Financial and treasury

(increased)

The main financial risks are the availability of short- and long-term funding to meet business needs, fluctuations in interest rates, movements in energy prices and other post-Brexit impacts.

·      Committed loan facilities are in place to deliver our strategy, with amendments in the year delivering additional covenant headroom (see notes 10 and 11)

·      Funding requirements are managed through regular forecasting and treasury management

·      The Board approves budgets and business plans

·      Relationships with lenders are managed through regular meetings

·      Our risks associated with financial instruments are disclosed in the annual report

We will continue to work with our banking syndicate to optimally manage our funding position and further deleverage. We plan to conclude our 2017 acquisition sale & leaseback programme in H1 2019

Information Technology

(maintained)

We depend on the reliability and capability of key information systems and technology. A major failure, a breach, or prolonged performance issues with store or head office systems could have an adverse impact on the business and its reputation.

·      All business-critical systems are well established and are supported by an appropriate disaster recovery strategy designed to ensure continuity of the business

·      Business continuity plans are tested on an annual basis

·      Regular reviews assess our vulnerability and our ability to re-establish operations in the event of a failure

·      Testing is performed to ensure data is controlled and protected

·      We are currently investing in a new ERP system (Oracle Fusion) to improve head office efficiency

·      We have processes in place to ensure GDPR compliance

We have a future IT roadmap and have plans to upgrade our EPOS systems in the next 24 months. We will also continue to evolve our store back office systems to improve efficiency and effectiveness

Operational cost base

(increased)

We have a relatively high cost base, consisting primarily of salary, property rental and energy costs. Increases in these costs without a corresponding increase in revenues could adversely impact our profitability.

·      We continually seek to remove unnecessary complexity from our operational procedures to optimise performance

·      We operate a flexible staffing model aligned to revenue levels

·      We monitor legislation and developments related to our costs, e.g. minimum wage, rents and energy tariffs, to allow us to plan and mitigate increases

·      Property management is a key function with regular review processes in place

·      We minimise energy costs by combining energy efficiency initiatives and forward purchasing

·      We regularly retender external contracts to ensure they remain market-competitive

·      We have an ongoing programme of estate optimisation to remove unprofitable stores

·      We manage exposure to fluctuating energy prices by forward buying electricity. We acknowledge that the forward contracts in place are derivatives, they are treated as a pre-agreed price for electricity

National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage will again increase above the rate of inflation in 2019. We have set up a group to focus on delivering efficiencies and process improvements in our operations.

Regulation

(maintained)

We operate in an environment governed

by strict regulations to ensure the safety

and protection of customers, colleagues, shareholders and other stakeholders. Regulations include alcohol licensing, employment, health and safety, data protection and the rules of the Stock Exchange. Failure to comply with relevant laws and regulations could result in sanctions and reputational damage.

·      We have clear accountability for compliance with all laws and regulations

·      Our policies and procedures are designed to meet all relevant requirements

·      We train colleagues to comply with all relevant legislation

·      We have established governance groups, such as our Health and Safety Strategy Committee to review and manage our compliance

·      Through third party memberships and expert advice, we keep up to date with evolving statute

Regulations impacting our business continue to change but we have processes in place to make sure we take proper account

of regulatory developments in the way

we conduct our business.

 

Brexit

 

We recognise that the UK's planned exit from the European Union (EU) creates some risks and uncertainties. We do not expect it to have a material impact on the business except in the event that the UK leaves the EU with no deal in place and this results in the most severe economic scenario.

 

Customers

Except in the event of a severe economic shock to the UK economy, we do not expect Brexit to have any significant impact on the behaviour of customers in McColl's. The grocery sector as a whole has a proven record of withstanding economic downturn. In recent periods of economic uncertainty consumers have tended to manage their budgets by shopping little and often, locally. Therefore the convenience sector in particular is largely protected from, and can even benefit from, broader negative economic trends.

 

Supply chain

It is estimated that around 35% of all the food we eat in the UK is sourced from the EU. Due to the nature of our product mix, we estimate that the proportion of products we source from the EU is considerably lower than average.

 

The most significant risk to food supplies is in the event of a no-deal Brexit where import delays could mean short shelf life products expire before they can reach their destination. We sell a relatively low proportion of chilled and fresh food with a short shelf life and as such are less exposed to this risk than other grocery retailers.

 

The majority of our products are sourced via UK wholesale partners. Morrisons is our largest wholesale partner, directly supplying c.1,300 of our stores.  As the UKs second largest food manufacturer, they source and manufacture a high proportion of products in the UK.  To mitigate the risk of a no-deal Brexit  Morrisons have applied for and been granted "approved economic operator status", which means that goods will be fast tracked through customs, hence reducing the risk with their non UK suppliers.

 

Labour

It is likely that in leaving the European Union there will be a restriction on free movement that could lead to a shortage of low skilled workers. We do not believe this presents a significant risk to the business because we have a low number of transient workers. The majority of our store colleagues work on a part-time basis and live locally to their store. However, we recognise that there is some risk that we could be impacted by the UK experiencing a greater demand for low skilled workers that could create recruitment challenges and lead to wage inflation.

 

 

Glossary of Terms

 

Introduction

 

In the reporting of financial information, the Directors have adopted various Alternative Performance Measures (APMs) of financial performance, position or cash flows other than those defined or specified under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

 

These measures are not defined by IFRS and therefore may not be directly comparable with other companies' APMs, including those in the Group's industry.

 

APMs should be considered in addition to IFRS measures and are not intended to be a substitute for IFRS measurements.

 

Purpose

 

The Directors believe that these APMs provide additional useful information on the underlying performance and position of McColl's.

 

APMs are also used to enhance the comparability of information between reporting periods by adjusting for non-recurring or uncontrollable factors which affect IFRS measures, to aid the user in understanding McColl's performance.

 

Consequently, APMs are used by the Directors and management for performance analysis, planning, reporting and incentive-setting purposes and have remained consistent with prior year.

 

The key APMs that the Group has focused on this year are as follows:

 

Like-for-like sales (LFL): This is a widely used indicator of a retailer's current trading performance and is a measure of growth in sales from stores that have been open for at least a year.  It includes sales from stores that have traded throughout the whole of the current and prior periods, and including VAT but excluding sales of fuel, lottery, mobile top-up, gift cards and travel tickets.

 

Adjusted EBITDA: This profit measure shows the Group's Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortisation adjusted for both property gains and losses and other adjusting items. 

 

Property gains and losses; are incomes and costs that arise from events and transactions in relation to the Group's property and not from the principal activity of the Group, i.e. that of an operator of convenience stores and newsagents. 

 

Adjusting items; relate to costs or incomes that derive from events or transactions that fall within the normal activities of the Group but which, individually or, if of a similar type, in aggregate, are excluded from the Group's adjusted profit measures due to their size and nature in order to reflect management's view of the performance of the Group.

 

Adjusted operating profit: Operating profit before the impact of adjusting items as explained above.

 

Adjusted earnings per share: Earnings per share before the impact of adjusting items.

 

APM

Closest equivalent IFRS measure

Note reference for reconciliation

Definition and purpose

Income statement

Revenue measures

 

 

 

Sales growth

No direct equivalent

Not applicable

Growth in sales is a ratio that measures year-on-year movement in Group sales for continuing operations for 52 weeks. It shows the annual rate of increase in the Group's sales and is considered a good indicator of how rapidly the Group's core business is growing.

Sales mix

No direct equivalent

Not applicable

The relative proportion or ratio of products sold compared to the same period in the prior year.

Like-for-like (LFL)

No direct equivalent

Not applicable

Like-for-like is a measure of growth in Group sales from stores that have been open for at least a year (but excludes prior year sales of stores closed during the year). It is a widely used indicator of a retailer's current trading performance and is important when comparing growth between retailers that have different profiles of expansion, disposals and closures. It's reported on an 'including VAT' basis, which aligns with the sales measurement by the field and stores teams, whose focus is on the retail performance.

Profit measures

 

 

 

Adjusted operating profit

Operating profit

Note 4

Operating profit before adjusting items is the headline measure of the Group's performance. It is based on operating profit before the impact of certain costs or incomes that derive from events or transactions that fall within the normal activities of the Group, but which are excluded by virtue of their size and nature in order to reflect management's view of the performance of the Group. This is a key management incentive metric.

Gross margin

No direct equivalent

Not applicable

Gross margin is calculated as Gross profit before adjusting items divided by revenue. Progression in gross margin is an important indicator of the Group's operating efficiency.

Profits/(losses) arising on property-related items

No direct equivalent

Not applicable

Profits/(losses) arising on property-related items relates to the Group's property activities including; gains and losses on disposal of property assets, sale and lease back of freehold interests; costs resulting from changes in the Group's store portfolio, including pre-opening and post-closure costs; and income/(charges) associated with impairment of non-trading property and related onerous contracts.  These items are disclosed separately to clearly identify the impact of these items versus the other operating expenses related to the core retail operations of the business. They can be one-time in nature and can have a disproportionate impact on profit between reporting periods.

Adjusted net finance costs

Finance costs

Not applicable

Total finance costs before adjusting items is the net finance costs adjusted for non-recurring one off items due to their size and nature.

Adjusted EBITDA

No direct equivalent

Note 4

This profit measure shows the Group's Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortisation adjusted for both Property gains and losses and other adjusting items, in order to provide shareholders with a measure of true underlying performance of the business.

Basic adjusted earnings per share (EPS)

No direct equivalent

Note 7

This relates to profit after tax before adjusting items divided by the basic weighted average number of shares, in order to provide shareholders with a measure of true underlying performance of the business.

Diluted adjusted earnings per share

Diluted earnings per share

Note 7

The difference between basic and diluted metric is the impact of the dilutive effect of share options and warrants in existence.

Balance sheet measures

 

 

Net debt

Borrowings less cash and related hedges

Note 11

Net debt comprises bank and other borrowings, finance lease payables, and net interest receivables/ payables, offset by cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments. It is a useful measure of the progress in generating cash and strengthening of the Group's balance sheet position and is a measure widely used by credit rating agencies.

 

 

Other

 

Capital expenditure (Capex):  The additions to property, plant and equipment and intangible assets.

 

FTE: Full-time equivalents.

 

RPI: Retail Price Index.

 

CPI: Consumer Price Index.

 

LPI: Limited Price Inflation

 

Total Shareholder Return (TSR):  The notional annualised return from a share, measured as the percentage change in the share price, plus the dividends paid with the gross dividends, reinvested in McColl's shares.  This is measured over both a one and three year period.

 

Grocery sales:  This includes ambient, fresh, frozen and household groceries, and food-to-go, but excludes impulse categories (including confectionery, crisps and snacks, soft drinks and ice cream), general merchandise, news and magazines, and services.

 

 

 

 


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Final Results - RNS