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Anglo American PLC   -  AAL   

Anglo American Preliminary Results 2018

Released 07:00 21-Feb-2019

RNS Number : 6621Q
Anglo American PLC
21 February 2019
 

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year end FINANCIAL REPORT

 

for the year ended 31 December 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 February 2019

Anglo American Preliminary Results 2018

 

Consistent performance improvements deliver 4% increase in underlying EBITDA to $9.2 billion

 

Mark Cutifani, Chief Executive of Anglo American, said: "We are delivering improvements on a consistent basis, with a further 4% increase in underlying EBITDA to $9.2 billion. Our commitment to disciplined capital allocation has helped strengthen our balance sheet by more than $10 billion over three years, with net debt reduced to $2.8 billion at the end of 2018. This strong financial result derives from our continued productivity improvements in the underlying operations and better than expected prices for many of our products.

 

"No degree of financial performance is worth a life, however, and in 2018, five of our colleagues tragically died in workplace safety incidents. The safety of our people is always front of mind and our determination to reach and sustain zero harm is our most pressing challenge.

 

"Our focus on efficiency and productivity, including through our Operating Model implementation, is continuing to deliver benefits - in terms of both safety and financial returns. In 2018, we produced 10% more product on a copper equivalent basis from half the number of assets we had in 2012. As a result, our productivity(1) per employee has doubled, supporting a 12 percentage point increase in mining margin(2) to 42% and placing us amongst the leaders in the industry. Over that six-year period, we have delivered $4.6 billion of annual underlying EBITDA improvement in terms of costs and volumes, including $0.4 billion in 2018. Looking forward, we see significant further potential and by 2022, we are targeting an additional $3-4 billion annual underlying EBITDA run-rate improvement, relative to 2017.

 

"Anglo American is a resilient and highly competitive business with a clear asset-led strategy. What's more, our world-class portfolio benefits from considerable organic growth options, particularly in those products that will supply a cleaner, more electrified world and that satisfy the consumer-led demands of a fast growing global middle-class. Our focus is on unlocking the very significant additional potential that we see within the business - from further productivity improvements, volume growth from existing and new operations, and the deployment of FutureSmart Mining™ technologies - and to do so safely and responsibly, maintaining strict capital discipline and creating a sustainable business in every sense."

 

Financial highlights - year ended 31 December 2018

·    Generated underlying EBITDA* of $9.2 billion, a 4% increase, and $3.2 billion of attributable free cash flow*

·    Delivered profit attributable to equity shareholders of $3.5 billion, a 12% increase

·    Reduced net debt* to $2.8 billion, a 37% reduction since 2017 - 0.3x net debt / underlying EBITDA

·    Achieved net cost and volume improvements of $0.4 billion(3)

·  Expected 2019 cost and volume improvements of $0.5 billion, and on track to deliver $3-4 billion annual EBITDA improvement by 2022, relative to 2017

·    Proposed final dividend of $0.51 per share, equal to 40% of second half underlying earnings*

 

Year ended

US$ million, unless otherwise stated

31 December 2018

31 December 2017

Change

Revenue

27,610

26,243

5%

Underlying EBITDA*

9,161

8,823

4%

Underlying earnings*

3,237

3,272

(1)%

Attributable free cash flow*

3,157

4,943

(36)%

Profit attributable to equity shareholders of the Company

3,549

3,166

12%

Underlying earnings per share* ($)

2.55

2.57

(1)%

Earnings per share ($)

2.80

2.48

13%

Dividend per share ($)

1.00

1.02

(2)%

Group attributable ROCE*

19%

19%

-

 

Terms with this symbol * are defined as Alternative Performance Measures (APMs). For more information on the APMs used by the Group, including definitions, please refer to page 63.

 

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE

Safety

Anglo American's safety performance is the subject of very significant management attention in order to eliminate the causes of harm in the workplace. Five people lost their lives in 2018, all in South Africa, two in each of our Platinum Group Metals (PGMs) and Coal businesses and one in our Diamonds business.  As a matter of urgency, we launched an Elimination of Fatalities Taskforce during 2018 to further interrogate drivers of fatal incidents at a more granular, cultural level, to understand how we can better manage fatal and catastrophic risks. Our determination to deliver our commitment to zero harm is our most pressing challenge.

 

The Group's total recordable case frequency rate for the year provides a broader picture of significant progress, with 2.66 injuries per million hours worked, a 16% improvement over the record performance rate achieved in 2017. However, we should not be experiencing major safety incidents and we have demonstrated time and again that even our most potentially hazardous businesses can be incident-free for long periods.

 

Environment

We recorded one Level 4 and five Level 3 environmental incidents in 2018. The most serious related to two leakages of non-hazardous iron ore slurry from Minas-Rio's pipeline in Brazil. Both leaks were stopped without delay, without injuries and a thorough clean-up of the surrounding area was completed. We also took a responsible approach to the inspection and repair of the pipeline, pre-emptively replacing a number of sections.

 

Our sustainability goals include our commitment to be a leader in environmental stewardship. By 2030, we aim to: reduce GHG emissions by 30% against a 2016 baseline and improve energy efficiency by 30%; achieve a 50% net reduction in freshwater abstraction in water-scarce regions; and deliver net-positive impacts in biodiversity wherever we operate. We are also working on ensuring all operations fully align with our Biodiversity Standard and our best-in-class Integrated Mine Closure Planning System. Currently, 12% of our energy needs are met by renewables, and we are working to increase this.

 

Tailings

We manage our tailings dams with the utmost care and have full confidence in the integrity of our 56 managed tailings storage facilities around the world. We are, of course, following developments carefully to ensure any learnings from recent tragic events are integrated into our own processes and controls. There is nothing we have seen to date to cause us to alter our already stringent approach to tailings dam safety management.

 

We have a mandatory Group Technical Standard for tailings dam safety management which exceeds regulatory requirements. We conduct daily and fortnightly inspections, with quarterly external audits performed by specialised consulting firms. There are also annual inspections performed by the Engineer of Record (who is external to Anglo American) who are themselves also subject to independent, external reviews. These processes are in addition to the various forms of remote and other monitoring technologies installed at appropriate sites that measure everything from ground movement to temperature and hydrology, as examples.

 

Sustainable mining

Our far-reaching Sustainable Mining Plan, launched in 2018 as part of the FutureSmart Mining™ programme, commits us to a series of ambitious medium and longer terms goals. These relate to three major areas of sustainability aligned to the UN's 2030 Sustainable Development Goals: trusted corporate leader (i.e. advocating for the highest standards of governance to drive transparency and trust in mining and mined products); healthy environment; and thriving communities. While our environmental goals will rely on many of the technologies we are beginning to deploy, we are also thinking innovatively to create regional ecosystems of sustainable economic activity, in partnership with appropriate development experts.

 

Anglo American has a long track record as a leader in sustainable, responsible mining. Such attributes were recognised in April 2018 in the inaugural Responsible Mining Index, across all metrics and particularly in relation to economic development, community wellbeing and lifecycle management.

  

(1)    Productivity indexed to 2012 benchmark.

(2)  The mining margin represents the Group's underlying EBITDA margin for the mining business. It excludes the impact of PGMs purchase of concentrate, third-party purchases made by De Beers, third-party trading activities performed by Marketing, the Eskom-tied South African domestic thermal coal business and reflects Debswana accounting treatment as a 50/50 joint venture.   

(3)  Excludes the impact of the suspension of operations at Minas-Rio.
 

Operational and financial review of Group results for the year ended

31 December 2018

 

OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE

 

We have continued to improve the performance of our assets through increased efficiency and productivity, including the implementation of our Operating Model and, as a result, have delivered $0.4 billion of cost and volume improvements in 2018 ($0.8 billion excluding above CPI increases in oil and other energy costs, and rail constraints at Kumba). Across the Group, production increased by 6% on a copper equivalent basis, excluding the impact of the stoppage at Minas-Rio, primarily driven by continued strong performances at Copper, Metallurgical Coal and De Beers, as well as improved production at our PGMs business. This was partly offset by curtailed production at Kumba Iron Ore as a result of third-party rail constraints.

 

Copper production increased by 15% to 668,300 tonnes (2017: 579,300 tonnes), with increases at all operations. Collahuasi delivered record copper in concentrate production, benefiting from a strong plant performance following the completion of planned plant improvement initiatives and planned higher ore grades. At Los Bronces, production increased by 20%, owing to strong mine and plant performance, as well as planned higher ore grades.

 

Metallurgical coal production increased by 11% to 21.8 Mt (2017: 19.7 Mt), driven by a record performance from Moranbah and production growth at Grosvenor.

 

De Beers' rough diamond production increased by 6% to 35.3 million carats (2017: 33.5 million carats). Production increases at Orapa and the contribution from the ramp-up of Gahcho Kué more than offset the effect of the temporary suspension of production at Venetia following a fatal incident and the placing of Voorspoed mine onto care and maintenance.

 

At our PGMs business, platinum production increased by 4% to 2,484,700 ounces (2017: 2,397,400 ounces) and palladium by 3% to 1,610,800 ounces (2017: 1,557,400 ounces), reflecting continued strong performance at Mogalakwena and ongoing operational improvements at Amandelbult. Refined platinum production decreased by 4% to 2,402,400 ounces (2017: 2,511,900 ounces) and refined palladium by 10% to 1,501,800 ounces (2017: 1,668,500 ounces) as scheduled smelter maintenance delayed refined production into 2019.

 

At Kumba, iron ore output decreased by 4% to 43.1 Mt (2017: 45.0 Mt) due to Transnet's rail performance constraints throughout 2018. In response, Kumba took the strategic decision to improve product quality to maximise the value of those tonnes railed to the port, which in turn reduced total production.

 

At Thermal Coal - South Africa, total export production decreased by 1% to 18.4 Mt (2017: 18.6 Mt), as operations continued to transition between mining areas.

 

Nickel production decreased by 3% to 42,300 tonnes (2017: 43,800 tonnes) owing to a 40-day planned maintenance stoppage at Barro Alto. Manganese ore production increased by 3% to 3.6 Mt (2017: 3.5 Mt), reflecting improved concentrator availability and favourable weather conditions at the Australian operations.

 

Group copper equivalent unit costs were in line with the prior year in both local currency and US dollar terms as the effect of cost and productivity initiatives offset the impact of inflation across the Group. A 9% decrease in unit costs at Copper, owing to increased production and continued cost savings across all the operations, was offset by Metallurgical Coal, where increased costs were incurred to establish new mining areas to achieve further productivity improvements, and at Kumba following lower production and higher strip ratios.

 

Excluded from the Group copper equivalent result is the impact of Minas-Rio suspending operations from March 2018, following the two pipeline leaks. The operations resumed after the receipt of the appropriate regulatory approvals on 20 December, following an extensive and detailed technical inspection and the precautionary replacement of certain sections of the pipeline. In addition, on 21 December, a key regulatory approval relating to the Minas-Rio Step 3 licence area was granted, providing greater operational flexibility and access to higher grade iron ore to support the increase of production towards the full design capacity of 26.5 million tonnes per year.

 

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Anglo American's profit attributable to equity shareholders increased to $3.5 billion (2017: $3.2 billion). Underlying earnings were $3.2 billion (2017: $3.3 billion), while operating profit was $6.1 billion (2017: $5.5 billion).

 

UNDERLYING EBITDA*

Group underlying EBITDA increased by 4% to $9.2 billion (2017: $8.8 billion). The underlying EBITDA margin was 30% (2017: 31%) with the mining margin increasing to 42% (2017: 40%). This was driven by strong prices across the Group, particularly the PGM basket of metals, thermal and metallurgical coal and nickel, as well as continued productivity improvements and cost control across the portfolio, that more than offset the impact of inflation across the Group. A reconciliation of 'Profit before net finance costs and tax', the closest equivalent IFRS measure to underlying EBITDA, is provided within note 3 to the Condensed financial statements.

 

Underlying EBITDA* by segment

 

$ million

Year ended

31 December 2018

Year ended

31 December 2017

De Beers

1,245

1,435

Copper

1,856

1,508

PGMs

1,062

866

Iron Ore

1,177

1,828

Coal

3,196

2,868

Nickel and Manganese

844

610

Corporate and other

(219)

(292)

Total

9,161

8,823

 

Underlying EBITDA* reconciliation 2017 to 2018

The reconciliation of underlying EBITDA from $8.8 billion in 2017 to $9.2 billion in 2018 shows the controllable factors (e.g. cost and volume), as well as those largely outside of management control (e.g. price, foreign exchange and inflation), that drive the Group's performance.

 

$ billion

 

 

2017 underlying EBITDA*

 

8.8

Price

 

0.9

Foreign exchange

 

0.2

Inflation

 

(0.4)

Net volume and cost improvements

 

0.4

Volume

0.2

 

Cash cost

0.2

 

Minas-Rio

 

(0.6)

Other

 

  (0.2)

2018 underlying EBITDA*

 

9.2

 

Price

Average market prices for the Group's basket of commodities and products increased by 4%, contributing $0.9 billion of improvement to underlying EBITDA. In our Coal business, the realised price for South African thermal export coal increased by 14%, while the realised price for Australian hard coking coal increased by 4%. The price achieved for the PGM basket of metals was 13% higher, largely due to palladium and rhodium, which recorded price increases of 17% and 101% respectively. The nickel realised price increased by 24% compared with 2017.

 

 

Foreign exchange

The positive foreign exchange impact on underlying EBITDA of $0.2 billion was largely due to revaluations of monetary items on the balance sheet, resulting from the effect of weaker producer closing currency rates.

 

Inflation

The Group's weighted average CPI for the period was 4%, in line with 2017. This was principally influenced by South Africa, which saw local CPI of around 5%. The impact of inflation on costs reduced underlying EBITDA by $0.4 billion.

 

Volume

Increased volumes across the portfolio benefited underlying EBITDA by $0.2 billion, driven by an excellent performance at Metallurgical Coal's longwall operations and strong mine and plant performance, coupled with planned higher ore grades, at Copper. This was partly offset by Kumba, which was affected by third-party rail constraints and a scheduled refurbishment of the shiploader at Saldanha Port, and by lower sales volumes at De Beers, reflecting the higher proportion of lower value diamonds sold in 2017.

 

Cost

The Group's cost improvements benefited underlying EBITDA by $0.2 billion, with cost saving initiatives across the Group and unit cost reductions at Copper outweighing the effects of above CPI inflationary pressure on the mining industry related largely to higher oil and electricity prices.

 

Minas-Rio

The negative impact on the Group's underlying EBITDA from the suspension of operations at Minas-Rio from March to December was $0.6 billion, compared to 2017. Production decreased to 3.4 Mt (2017: 16.8 Mt).

 

UNDERLYING EARNINGS*

Profit for the year increased by 8% to $4.4 billion (2017: $4.1 billion). Group underlying earnings were marginally lower at $3.2 billion (2017: $3.3 billion), as a result of increased depreciation and amortisation charges, offset by the 4% increase in underlying EBITDA.

 

Reconciliation from underlying EBITDA* to underlying earnings*

 

 

$ million

Year ended

31 December 2018

Year ended

31 December 2017

Underlying EBITDA*

9,161

8,823

Depreciation and amortisation

(2,784)

(2,576)

Net finance costs and income tax expense

(2,265)

(2,223)

Non-controlling interests

(875)

(752)

Underlying earnings*

3,237

3,272

 

Depreciation and amortisation

Depreciation and amortisation increased to $2.8 billion (2017: $2.6 billion), owing to higher sustaining capital expenditure, increased production at Moranbah and Grosvenor and stronger average local currencies.

 

Net finance costs and income tax expense

Net finance costs, before special items and remeasurements, were $0.4 billion (2017: $0.5 billion). Increases in LIBOR were offset by lower average borrowings during the year resulting from a 24% reduction in gross debt.

 

The underlying effective tax rate was 31.3% (2017: 29.7%). The effective tax rate in 2018 benefited from the release of a deferred tax liability balance in Chile, partially offset by the impact of the relative levels of profits arising in the Group's operating jurisdictions. In future periods, it is expected that the underlying effective tax rate will remain above the UK statutory tax rate. The tax charge for the year, before special items and remeasurements, was $1.5 billion (2017: $1.3 billion).

 

Non-controlling interests

The share of underlying earnings attributable to non-controlling interests of $0.9 billion (2017: $0.8 billion) principally relates to minority shareholdings in Kumba, Copper and PGMs.

 

SPECIAL ITEMS AND REMEASUREMENTS

Special items and remeasurements show a net gain of $0.3 billion (2017: net charge of $0.1 billion) and included impairment reversals of $1.1 billion at Moranbah-Grosvenor and Capcoal (Metallurgical Coal), partially offset by the write-off of assets in De Beers' South African operations of $0.1 billion following the decision to close Voorspoed; the write-down to fair value of PGMs' investment in Bafokeng-Rasimone Platinum Mine of $0.1 billion and a loss on disposal of $0.1 billion relating to Union; as well as losses arising on bond buybacks completed in the year (Corporate and other) of $0.1 billion.

 

Full details of the special items and remeasurements recorded are included in note 9 to the Condensed financial statements.

 

CASH FLOW

Cash flows from operations

Cash flows from operations decreased to $7.8 billion (2017: $8.4 billion). An increase in underlying EBITDA from subsidiaries and joint operations was offset by lower working capital movements. In 2017, working capital movements included operating payable inflows from transactions in PGMs that were not repeated in 2018.

 

Cash outflows on operating working capital were $30 million (2017: inflows of $879 million), driven mainly by an increase in inventories at PGMs resulting from refining capacity constraints due to maintenance work on the processing assets, and at Kumba owing to third-party rail constraints. These were offset by operating payables inflows across the Group.

 

Capital expenditure*

 

$ million

Year ended

31 December 2018

Year ended

31 December 2017

Stay-in-business

1,617

1,310

Development and stripping

796

586

Life extension projects(1)

245

216

Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment

(162)

(52)

Sustaining capital

2,496

2,060

Growth projects(1)

340

168

Total

2,836

2,228

Capitalised operating cash flows

(18)

(78)

Total capital expenditure

2,818

2,150

 

(1)    Life extension projects and growth projects are collectively referred to as expansionary capital expenditure.

 

Capital expenditure increased to $2.8 billion (2017: $2.2 billion), with rigorous capital discipline continuing to be applied to all projects. Sustaining capital increased to $2.5 billion (2017: $2.1 billion), driven by stronger average local currencies, planned additional stay-in-business expenditure across the Group, in line with our increased production base, and increased capitalised development and stripping expenditure primarily due to longwall productivity improvements at Metallurgical Coal and an optimisation of the mine plan at Mogalakwena.

 

In 2019, we expect total capital expenditure to increase to $3.8-$4.1 billion after utilising the remaining $0.5 billion of capital expenditure funding for Quellaveco from the Mitsubishi subscription.

 

 

Attributable free cash flow*

The Group generated attributable free cash flow of $3.2 billion (2017: $4.9 billion). Cash flows from operations of $7.8 billion were offset by increased sustaining capital expenditure of $2.5 billion (2017: $2.1 billion), driven by stronger local currencies, planned additional stay-in-business capital expenditure and increased capitalised development and stripping expenditure. In addition, there were higher tax payments at Metallurgical Coal and Copper and an increase in dividend payments to minority shareholders.

 

Dividends

In line with the Group's established dividend policy to pay out 40% of underlying earnings, the Board has proposed a dividend of 51 cents per share, equivalent to $660 million, bringing the total dividends paid and proposed for the year to $1.00 per share (2017: $1.02 per share).

 

 

NET DEBT*

$ million

2018

2017

Opening net debt* at 1 January

(4,501)

(8,487)

Underlying EBITDA* from subsidiaries and joint operations

7,827

7,632

Working capital movements

(30)

879

Other cash flows from operations

(15)

(136)

Cash flows from operations

7,782

8,375

Capital expenditure*

(2,818)

(2,150)

Cash tax paid

(1,393)

(843)

Dividends from associates, joint ventures and financial asset investments

738

517

Net interest(1)

(315)

(355)

Dividends paid to non-controlling interests

(837)

(601)

Attributable free cash flow*

3,157

4,943

Dividends to Anglo American plc shareholders

(1,291)

(618)

Disposals

193

52

Foreign exchange and fair value movements

(248)

135

Other net debt movements(2)

(158)

(526)

Total movement in net debt*(3)

1,653

3,986

Closing net debt* at 31 December

(2,848)

(4,501)

 

(1)   Includes cash outflows of $41 million (2017: inflows of $22 million), relating to interest payments on derivatives hedging net debt, which are included in cash flows from derivatives related to financing activities.

(2)    Principally made up of the purchase of shares for employee share schemes and losses recognised on bond buybacks, offset in 2018 by inflows related to the change in ownership interest in Quellaveco.

(3)    Net debt excludes the own credit risk fair value adjustment on derivatives of $15 million (2017: $9 million).

 

Net debt (including related derivatives) of $2.8 billion decreased by $1.7 billion, representing gearing of 9% (2017: 13%). Net debt at 31 December 2018 comprised cash and cash equivalents of $6.5 billion (2017: $7.8 billion) and gross debt, including related derivatives, of $9.4 billion (2017: $12.3 billion). The reduction in net debt was driven by $3.2 billion of attributable free cash flow, partly offset by the payment of dividends to Group shareholders in 2018 (dividend payments resumed in the second half of 2017). During the year, there were inflows of $0.9 billion related to the change in ownership interest in Quellaveco; this inflow is being used to fund capital expenditure at the project, with $0.5 billion remaining at 31 December 2018.

 

BALANCE SHEET

Net assets of the Group increased to $29.8 billion (2017: $28.9 billion) as the profit for the year more than offset the effects of foreign exchange on operating assets denominated in local currency, and dividend payments to Company shareholders and non-controlling interests. Sustaining capital expenditure of $2.5 billion was offset by depreciation and amortisation of $2.7 billion.

 

ATTRIBUTABLE ROCE*

Attributable ROCE was in line with the prior year at 19%. Attributable underlying EBIT was $5.2 billion (2017: $5.1 billion), reflecting higher prices, improved sales volumes at Metallurgical Coal and Copper and the continued delivery of cost-efficiency programmes across the Group, offset by inflation and the Minas-Rio production stoppage. Average attributable capital employed was constant at $27.4 billion owing to capital expenditure being largely offset by depreciation and amortisation.

 

LIQUIDITY AND FUNDING

The Group's liquidity remains conservative at $13.9 billion (2017: $16.8 billion), made up of $6.5 billion of cash (2017: $7.8 billion) and $7.3 billion of undrawn committed facilities (2017: $9.0 billion). The reduction in Group liquidity, in line with our strategy of lowering the cost of the overall capital structure, was driven primarily by a continued focus on debt reduction and the refinancing of a number of credit facilities outlined in the transactions below. These were partially offset by strong positive attributable free cash flow.

 

In March 2018, the Group completed the repurchase of $1.5 billion (including the cost of unwinding associated derivatives) of US- and Euro-denominated bonds with maturities from April 2019 to April 2021. The Group also issued a $0.7 billion 10-year bond in the US bond markets.

 

In May 2018, the Group completed the repurchase of $0.6 billion (including the cost of unwinding associated derivatives) of US-denominated bonds with maturities between May 2020 and September 2020.

 

These transactions, as well as $1.3 billion of bond maturities during 2018, have reduced short term refinancing requirements, increased the weighted average maturity of outstanding bonds by approximately one year to 5.0 years and reduced gross debt.

 

In March 2018, the Group replaced a number of credit facilities maturing between March 2019 and March 2020, with a total value of $5.4 billion, with a $4.5 billion credit facility maturing in March 2023.

 

PORTFOLIO UPGRADE

In 2018, the Group completed a number of transactions, including the sale of our 88.2% interest in the Drayton thermal coal mine (on care and maintenance since 2016) and the Drayton South project in Australia. In South Africa, we completed the sale of the New Largo thermal coal project and the Eskom-tied domestic thermal coal operations, PGMs' 33% interest in the Bafokeng-Rasimone Platinum Mine associate, as well as its 11% listed stake in Royal Bafokeng Platinum, its 85% interest in Union mine and 50.1% interest in Masa Chrome Company.

 

We also completed the acquisitions of the remaining 50% interest in the Mototolo joint operation in South Africa from Glencore and Kagiso Platinum Ventures; and in Canada, the Chidliak Diamond Resource (through De Beers) through the acquisition of Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

 

Other transactions

In July 2018, Anglo American Platinum Limited (Platinum) announced that it had subscribed for interests in two UK-based venture capital funds. Platinum's commitment to the funds is matched by a commitment from South Africa's Government Employees Pension Fund represented by the Public Investment Corporation SOC Limited.

 

Also in July, Anglo American completed a sale and leaseback transaction with M&G Investments with the intention of redeveloping and relocating the Group's London headquarters to Charterhouse Street.

 

 

THE BOARD

In September 2018, Anglo American announced that Sir Philip Hampton and Jack Thompson would step down from the Board after nine years of service.  On 31 December 2018, Sir Philip Hampton stepped down from the Board as Senior Independent Director and chair of the Remuneration Committee.  On 1 January 2019, Dr Byron Grote, a non-executive director since 2013 and chair of the Audit Committee since 2014, was appointed as Senior Independent Director.  With effect from the same date, Anne Stevens, a non-executive director since 2012, was appointed as chair of the Remuneration Committee.

 

With effect from the close of the Annual General Meeting on 30 April 2019, Jack Thompson will step down from the Board as a non-executive director and chair of the Sustainability Committee. Ian Ashby, a non‑executive director since 2017, will succeed Jack Thompson as chair of the Sustainability Committee on 30 April 2019.

 

The names of the Directors and the skills and experience our Board members contribute to the long-term sustainable success of the Anglo American Group are set out in the Annual Report 2018 and on the Group's website www.angloamerican.com/about-us/leadership-team/board

 

PRINCIPAL RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES

Anglo American plc is exposed to a variety of risks and uncertainties which may have a financial, operational or reputational impact on the Group, and which may also have an impact on the achievement of social, economic and environmental objectives.

 

The principal risks and uncertainties facing the Group at the 2018 year-end are set out in detail in the strategic report section of the Annual Report 2018. The principal risks relate to the following:

 

·      Catastrophic risks

·      Political and regulatory

·      Safety

·      Product prices

·      Corruption

·      Operational performance

·      Water

·      Cyber security

·      Future demand for PGMs

·      Future demand for diamonds

 

The Group is exposed to changes in the economic environment, as with any other business. Details of any key risks and uncertainties specific to the period are covered in the Operations review section.

 

The Annual Report 2018 is available on the Group's website www.angloamerican.com.

 

 

DE BEERS

 

Financial and operational metrics(1)

 

 

Production

volume

Sales

volume

 

Price

Unit

cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying EBITDA
margin

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

ROCE*

 

'000
cts

'000
cts(2)

$/ct(3)

$/ct(4)

$m(5)

$m

 

$m

$m(6)

 

De Beers

35,297

31,656

171

60

6,082

1,245

20%

694

417

8%

Prior year

33,454

32,455

162

63

5,841

1,435

25%

873

273

9%

Botswana (Debswana)

24,132

-

155

28

-

495

-

441

97

-

Prior year

22,684

-

159

28

-

484

-

447

86

-

Namibia

(Namdeb Holdings)

2,008

-

550

274

-

176

-

140

38

-

Prior year

1,805

-

539

257

-

176

-

146

33

-

South Africa (DBCM)

4,682

-

109

54

-

163

-

58

177

-

Prior year

5,208

-

129

62

-

267

-

119

114

-

Canada(7)

4,475

-

144

52

-

231

-

78

127

-

Prior year

3,757

-

235

57

-

205

-

58

(5)

-

Trading

-

-

-

-

-

413

-

407

2

-

Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

449

-

443

1

-

Other(8)

-

-

-

-

-

(233)

-

(430)

(24)

-

Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

(146)

-

(340)

44

-

                         

 

(1)  Prepared on a consolidated accounting basis, except for production, which is stated on a 100% basis except for the Gahcho Kué joint venture in Canada, which is on an attributable 51% basis.

(2)    Consolidated sales volumes exclude pre-commercial production sales volumes from Gahcho Kué. Total sales volumes (100%), which are comparable to production, were 33.7 million carats (2017: 35.1 million carats). Total sales volumes (100%) include pre-commercial production sales volumes from Gahcho Kué and De Beers Group's JV partners' 50% proportionate share of sales to entities outside De Beers Group from Diamond Trading Company Botswana and Namibia Diamond Trading Company.

(3)  Pricing for the mining business units is based on 100% selling value post-aggregation of goods. The De Beers realised price includes the price impact of the sale of non-equity product and, as a result, is not directly comparable to De Beers unit costs, which relate to equity production only.

(4)  Unit cost is based on consolidated production and operating costs, excluding depreciation and operating special items, divided by carats recovered.

(5)  Includes rough diamond sales of $5.4 billion (2017: $5.2 billion).

(6)  In 2018, includes the acquisition of Peregrine Diamonds Limited for a consideration of $87 million. In 2017, includes pre-commercial production capitalised operating cash inflows from Gahcho Kué.

(7)  In 2017, price excludes Gahcho Kué contribution from sales related to pre-commercial production, which were capitalised in the first half of 2017. Unit costs include Gahcho Kué contribution following achievement of commercial production on 2 March 2017.

(8)  Other includes Element Six, downstream, acquisition accounting adjustments and corporate.

 

Financial and operational overview

Total revenue increased by 4% to $6.1 billion (2017: $5.8 billion), with rough diamond sales increasing by 4% to $5.4 billion (2017: $5.2 billion), driven by improved overall consumer demand for diamond jewellery and a 1% increase in the average rough diamond price index. The average realised price increased by 6% to $171/carat (2017: $162/carat), reflecting the lower proportion of lower value rough diamonds being sold in the second half, which resulted in a 2% decrease in consolidated sales volumes to 31.7 million carats (2017: 32.5 million carats). Other revenue also increased owing to improved 'high end' jewellery sales at De Beers Jewellers (consolidated for a full year in 2018, compared with nine months in 2017), partly offset by a 5% decrease in Element Six revenue due to a reduction in sales to the oil and gas market.

 

Underlying EBITDA decreased by 13% to $1,245 million (2017: $1,435 million). While unit costs and upstream profit margins were maintained, De Beers undertook incremental expenditure on a number of new initiatives, including the launch of Lightbox Jewelry (Lightbox™), Tracr™ and Gemfair™, as well as increasing expenditure in marketing, exploration and evaluation in Canada and increasing provisions in respect of closure obligations. Margins in the trading business were lower owing to volatile market conditions, and the margin at Element Six decreased as a result of lower sales to the oil and gas market.

Markets

Preliminary data for 2018 indicates an improvement in global consumer demand for diamond jewellery, in US dollar terms. Global growth during the first half of the year was driven by solid US and Chinese consumer demand. However, during the second half, while the US maintained its growth rate, increased political and policy uncertainty and stock exchange volatility led to a general slowdown of demand. Chinese demand also slowed following the escalation in US-China trade tensions, slower economic growth and stock market volatility. In India, the significant depreciation of the rupee reduced local demand in US dollar terms.

 

The midstream started the year on a positive note due to healthy demand for polished diamonds from US and Chinese retailers. However, in the second half, the low-priced product segment came under considerable pressure due to weak demand and surplus availability, the rapid depreciation of the rupee and a reduction in bank financing in the midstream. This resulted in a surplus of low-priced polished diamonds at the end of the year, leading to lower sales at the start of 2019.

 

Operational performance

Mining and manufacturing

Rough diamond production increased by 6% to 35.3 million carats (2017: 33.5 million carats), which was in the lower half of the production guidance range of 35-36 million carats.

 

In Botswana (Debswana), production increased by 6% to 24.1 million carats (2017: 22.7 million carats). Production at Jwaneng was flat, as the effect of processing planned lower grades was offset by a 12% increase in plant throughput. At Orapa, a 13% increase in output was driven by higher plant utilisation and the full effect of the successful restart of the Damtshaa operation.

 

In Namibia (Namdeb Holdings), production increased by 11% to 2.0 million carats (2017: 1.8 million carats). Production from the marine operation increased by 4%, driven by fewer in-port days for the Mafuta crawler vessel and the adoption of a technology-led approach for optimising the performance of the drill fleet. Production at the land operations increased by 34% to 0.6 million carats (2017: 0.4 million carats) as a result of access to consistently higher grades, despite placing Elizabeth Bay onto care and maintenance in December.

 

In South Africa (DBCM), production decreased by 10% to 4.7 million carats (2017: 5.2 million carats), owing to a period of suspended production at Venetia following a fatal incident, as well as lower run-of-mine ore grades experienced as the mine approaches the end of the open pit. Output was also affected by the placing of Voorspoed onto care and maintenance in the fourth quarter in preparation for closure.

 

In Canada, production increased by 19% to 4.5 million carats (2017: 3.8 million carats) due to the full year contribution from Gahcho Kué, which entered commercial production in March 2017, and higher grades at Victor. Victor is due to cease production in the first half of 2019, when the open pit is expected to have been depleted.

 

Brands 

Significant progress was made across the De Beers Group brands in 2018. De Beers Jewellers opened new stores in Hong Kong and in Xi'an, China, and launched new franchise partnerships in Russia and Saudi Arabia. In May, De Beers Jewellers also launched a new online store in partnership with Farfetch, a global marketplace for the luxury industry with a presence in 100 countries.

 

Forevermark™ is now available in more than 2,400 retail outlets globally. New launches took place in Indonesia, Nepal, Bangladesh, Germany and France, as well as the opening of its first stand-alone store in Africa, in Botswana. In the year the brand celebrated its 10th anniversary, it launched a new retail concept, Libert'aime™, by Forevermark™.

 

 

De Beers Group launched a number of new initiatives in 2018. Lightbox™, a laboratory-grown diamond fashion jewellery brand, was launched in the US and recorded its first sales in September. Tracr™, De Beers Group's blockchain project, was announced in January 2018. GemFair™, an industry-wide pilot programme to create a secure and transparent route to market for ethically sourced artisanal and small-scale mined (ASM) diamonds, was launched in April, with the first export of diamonds in December.

 

Outlook

Although current economic forecasts remain positive, the outlook for 2019 global diamond jewellery consumer demand faces a number of headwinds, including the risk of a potential intensification of US-China trade tensions, the Chinese government's ability to rebalance economic growth towards consumption, and further exchange rate volatility.

 

Production in 2019 is expected to be in the range of 31-33 million carats, subject to trading conditions. The lower production is driven by the planned process of exiting from the Venetia open pit, with the underground operation becoming the principal source of ore from 2023. Associated with this, an increased proportion of production in 2019 is expected to come from De Beers Group's joint venture partners, a proportion of which generates a trading margin, which is lower than the mining margin generated from own-mined production.

 

 

COPPER

Financial and operational metrics

 

Production

volume

Sales

volume

Price

 

Unit

cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying EBITDA

 margin(2)

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

ROCE*

 

kt

kt(1)

c/lb(2)

c/lb(3)

$m(4)

$m

 

$m

$m

 

Copper

668

672

283

134

5,168

1,856

48%

1,234

703

22%

Prior year

579

580

290

147

4,233

1,508

41%

923

665

16%

Los Bronces

370

376

-

145

2,175

969

45%

625

217

-

Prior year

308

307

-

169

1,839

737

40%

401

245

-

Collahuasi(5)

246

243

-

105

1,460

960

66%

736

295

-

Prior year

231

232

-

113

1,314

806

61%

594

243

-

Quellaveco(6)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

131

-

Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

128

-

Other operations

53

53

-

-

1,533

82

26%

28

60

-

Prior year

40

41

-

-

1,080

76

16%

39

49

-

Projects and corporate

-

-

-

-

-

(155)

-

(155)

-

-

Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

(111)

-

(111)

-

 

(1)  Excludes 178 kt third-party sales (2017: 111 kt).

(2) Realised price, excludes impact of third-party sales.

(3)  C1 unit cost includes by-product credits.

(4)  Revenue is shown after deduction of treatment and refining charges (TC/RCs).

(5)  44% share of Collahuasi production, sales and financials.

(6)    Capex is presented on an attributable basis after deducting direct funding from non-controlling interests. FY 2018 capex, on a 100%   basis, was $505 million. $187 million was spent prior to project approval on 26 July, of which the Group funded $131 million and Mitsubishi funded $56 million. A further $318 million was spent post-approval, of which the Group's 60% share was funded from the Mitsubishi syndication transaction and hence is not included in reported capex.

 

Financial and operational overview

Underlying EBITDA increased by 23% to $1,856 million (2017: $1,508 million), driven by higher production and lower unit costs across all operations. Unit costs decreased by 9% to 134 c/lb (2017: 147 c/lb), the lowest since 2010, as a result of increased production and continued sustainable cost savings at all operations that fully offset the impact of inflation. Production increased by 15% to 668,300 tonnes (2017: 579,300 tonnes). At 31 December 2018, 179,100 tonnes of copper were provisionally priced at an average price of 271 c/lb.

 

Markets

 

 

2018

2017

Average market price (c/lb)

296

280

Average realised price (c/lb)

283

290

 

The differences between market price and realised price are largely a function of the timing of sales across the year and provisional pricing adjustments.

 

The average LME cash copper price was 6% higher, though spot prices closed the year 17% lower, despite falling exchange inventories. Prices weakened notably from mid-year as trade frictions between the US and China escalated. Furthermore, China's efforts to rein in shadow financing resulted in tighter liquidity, slowing growth across key copper-consuming sectors. Reflecting such developments, funds generally showed a lack of risk appetite through the year.

 

Operational performance

At Los Bronces, production increased by 20% to 369,500 tonnes (2017: 308,300 tonnes) owing to strong mine and plant performance, as well as planned higher grades (0.76% vs. 2017: 0.71%). C1 unit costs decreased by 14% to 145 c/lb (2017: 169 c/lb) reflecting the strong operational performance and higher by-product credits

(primarily molybdenum).

 

At Collahuasi, Anglo American's attributable share of copper production was 246,000 tonnes, an increase of 7% (2017: 230,500 tonnes), representing another record year of copper in concentrate production for the operation. Production benefited from strong plant performance following the successful completion of planned major maintenance of Line 3 (responsible for 60% of plant throughput), the installation of 24 new flotation cells during the first half of the year and planned higher grades (1.29% vs. 2017: 1.25%). C1 unit costs decreased by 7% to 105 c/lb (2017: 113 c/lb), reflecting the strong production performance, additional stripping credits and higher by-product credits.

 

Production at El Soldado increased by 30% to 52,700 tonnes (2017: 40,500 tonnes), owing largely to the temporary suspension of mine operations during the first half of 2017, which resulted in 6,000 tonnes of lost output, and planned higher ore grade (0.85% vs. 2017: 0.69%). C1 unit costs decreased by 12% to 206 c/lb (2017: 233 c/lb).

 

QUELLAVECO UPDATE

Project approval and syndication

In July 2018, the Board approved the development of the Quellaveco copper project in Peru, with an expected capital cost of $5.0-$5.3 billion. At the same time, and aligned with the Group's disciplined approach to capital allocation, agreement was reached with Mitsubishi to increase its interest in Anglo American Quellaveco S.A. (AAQSA) from 18.1% to 40% via the issuance of new shares. Mitsubishi subscribed $500 million in upfront consideration and an additional $351 million to fund its initial share of capital expenditure, resulting in a total cash subscription of $851 million. The Group will receive up to a further $100 million in net payments(1) from AAQSA conditional on the achievement of certain prescribed throughput rates. As a result of the syndication transaction, the Group's share of capital expenditure to develop Quellaveco is $2.5-$2.7 billion.

 

Project update

Project execution is on track, benefiting from early works completed during the feasibility study stage. All major

permits are in place. In line with plan, the diversion of the Asana river was successfully completed in early December, the first major milestone of the project. Engineering, contracting and procurement are well advanced, with earthworks also meaningfully progressed. The full complement of accommodation required for workers will be available during the first half of 2019.

 

The priority in 2019 is to continue progressing earthworks and start concrete works at the plant site. First production is due in 2022, with the ramp-up complete in 2023. The project will deliver around 300,000 tonnes per annum of copper equivalent production on average in the first 10 years of operation.

 

Total capital expenditure funded by the Group in 2018 was $131 million, representing the Group's attributable share prior to project approval in July. Post-approval, capital expenditure (on a 100% basis) was $318 million, of which the Group's 60% share was funded from the syndication transaction with Mitsubishi described above.

 

Operational outlook

Production guidance for 2019 is 630,000-660,000 tonnes.

 

 

 

(1) The payment, by way of preference dividend, will be grossed up to take account of the Group shareholding in AAQSA.

 

 

PLATINUM GROUP METALS

Financial and operational metrics

 

 

 

Production

volume platinum

Production

volume palladium

Sales

volume platinum

Basket price

Unit

cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying

EBITDA

 margin(5)

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

ROCE*

 

koz(1)

koz(1)

        koz(2)

$/Pt oz(3)

$/Pt oz(4)

$m

$m

 

$m

$m

 

PGMs

2,485

1,611

2,424

2,219

1,561

5,680

1,062

29%

705

496

15%

Prior year

2,397

1,557

2,505

1,966

1,443

5,078

866

26%

512

355

10%

Mogalakwena

495

541

492

2,759

1,398

1,367

623

46%

478

210

-

 Prior year

464

509

467

2,590

1,179

1,211

578

48%

448

151

-

Amandelbult

443

205

445

2,222

1,717

996

153

15%

96

74

-

Prior year

438

202

459

1,868

1,596

858

88

10%

34

34

-

Other operations(6)

386

268

367

-

-

1,100

132

12%

9

212

-

 Prior year

474

297

497

-

-

1,125

83

7%

(59)

170

-

Purchase of concentrate(7)

1,161

597

1,120

-

-

2,217

218

10%

186

-

-

 Prior year

1,021

549

1,082

-

-

1,884

173

9%

145

-

-

Projects and corporate

-

-

-

-

-

-

(64)

-

(64)

-

-

 Prior year

----

-

-

-

-

-

(56)

-

(56)

-

-

                         

 

(1)    Production disclosure reflects own-mined production and purchase of metal in concentrate.

(2)    Sales volumes exclude the sale of refined metal purchased from third parties.

(3)    Average US$ realised basket price. Excludes the impact of the sale of refined metal purchased from third parties.

(4)    Total cash operating costs - includes on-mine, smelting and refining costs only.

(5)  Underlying EBITDA margins exclude the impact of the sale of refined metal purchased from third parties. In addition, the total PGMs margin excludes purchase of concentrate.

(6)  Includes Unki, Union (prior to disposal), Mototolo (post-acquisition), PGMs' share of joint operations and revenue from trading activities.

(7)  Purchase of concentrate from joint operations, associates and third parties for processing into refined metals.

 

Financial and operational overview

Underlying EBITDA increased by 23% to $1,062 million (2017: $866 million), largely as a result of a 13% increase in the basket price driven by stronger prices for palladium, rhodium, ruthenium and nickel. Unit costs increased by 8% to $1,561/ounce (2017: $1,443/ounce) due to the impact of inflation and a change in mine plan at Mogalakwena leading to an increase in waste mined and a reduction in ore stockpiled.

 

Markets

 

 

2018

2017

Average platinum market price ($/oz)

880

950

Average palladium market price ($/oz)

1,029

871

Average rhodium market price ($/oz)

2,214

1,097

Average gold market price ($/oz)

1,269

1,258

US$ realised basket price ($/Pt oz)

2,219

1,966

Rand realised basket price (R/Pt oz)

29,601

26,213

 

 

Strong prices for palladium, rhodium and the minor platinum group metals outweighed a 7% decline in the platinum price during 2018, with the basket price climbing by 13% in dollar terms as a result. The platinum price was driven lower, primarily by a decline in the share of diesel engines in the European car sector. Despite disappointing global car sales, tighter global emissions regulation supported the prices of palladium and rhodium, with their average price for the year increasing by 18% and 102% respectively.

 

Operational performance

Total platinum production (metal in concentrate) increased by 4% to 2,484,700 ounces (2017: 2,397,400 ounces), while total palladium output was 3% higher at 1,610,800 ounces (2017: 1,557,400 ounces).

 

Own-mined production

Own-mined production is inclusive of ounces from Mogalakwena, Amandelbult, Unki, Union (prior to its disposal on 1 February 2018), and 50% of joint operation production, with 100% of Mototolo from 1 November 2018, following the completion of the acquisition of the remaining 50% on this date.

 

Own-mined platinum production decreased by 4% to 1,323,600 ounces (2017: 1,376,200 ounces), while palladium production increased marginally to 1,013,500 ounces (2017: 1,008,700). Excluding Union, own‑mined platinum production increased by 7% to 1,312,000 ounces (2017: 1,221,700) and palladium production increased by 8% to 1,008,300 ounces (2017: 937,300) on the back of a strong operational performance across the portfolio.

 

Mogalakwena's platinum production increased by 7% to 495,100 ounces (2017: 463,800 ounces), and palladium production increased by 6% to 540,900 ounces (2017: 508,900 ounces) through mining a higher grade area as planned, as well as optimisation of the primary mill at the North concentrator plant which led to improved throughput and metal recovery.

 

At Amandelbult, platinum production increased by 1% to 442,700 ounces (2017: 438,000 ounces), and palladium output by 1% to 205,100 ounces (2017: 202,500 ounces) as increased underground production was delivered to the concentrator, primarily from Dishaba's underground operations. Dishaba mine development work led to a 7% increase in immediately stope-able reserves.

 

Platinum production from other operations decreased by 19% to 385,800 ounces (2017: 474,400 ounces) and palladium production by 10% to 267,600 ounces (2017: 297,300 ounces), driven by the sale of Union mine to Siyanda Resources (Siyanda) on 1 February 2018, from which date Union production was purchased as concentrate. Excluding Union, platinum production from other operations increased by 17%, driven by PGMs' share of platinum production from joint operations increasing by 10% to 270,800 ounces (2017: 245,300 ounces) and its share of palladium production increasing by 9% to 176,000 ounces (2017: 161,500 ounces), as well as the acquisition of the remaining 50% of Mototolo on 1 November 2018.

 

Purchase of concentrate

Purchase of concentrate increased by 14% and 9% for platinum and palladium respectively. The inclusion of concentrate from Union following the sale to Siyanda was partly offset by the removal of unprofitable ounces following the closure of Bokoni, which was placed onto care and maintenance in 2017.

 

Refined production

Refined platinum production decreased by 4% to 2,402,400 ounces (2017: 2,511,900 ounces), while refined palladium output decreased by 10% to 1,501,800 ounces (2017: 1,668,500 ounces). The reduction was primarily attributable to the planned rebuild of Mortimer smelter in the second quarter of 2018; the partial rebuild at Polokwane smelter which was completed during the second half of the year; commissioning of the Unki smelter in the third quarter; and maintenance work on other processing assets, which collectively resulted in a build-up of work-in-progress inventory. Furthermore, 2017 refined production included 130,000 platinum ounces (and associated PGMs) that were toll-refined by a third party following the Waterval Furnace 1 run-out in 2016. It is expected that the build-up of work-in-progress inventory will be processed in full during 2019.

 

 

Sales volumes

Platinum sales volumes, excluding refined metals purchased from third parties, decreased by 3% to 2,424,200 ounces (2017: 2,504,600 ounces), while palladium sales decreased by 4% to 1,513,100 ounces (2017: 1,571,700 ounces). The overall decrease resulted from lower refined production, compensated in part by a drawdown in refined platinum inventory levels. In comparison, there were high sales volumes in 2017 owing to the refining of the backlog of material from the Waterval smelter run-out in the fourth quarter of 2016. Trading activities generated further sales volumes of 94,000 platinum ounces and 124,500 palladium ounces.

 

Operational outlook

From 1 January 2019, Sibanye 4E(1) material is no longer purchased as concentrate, but toll-treated, with the refined metal returned to Sibanye. As a result, platinum production (metal in concentrate) for 2019 is expected to be lower than for 2018 at 2.0-2.1 million ounces. Palladium production (metal in concentrate) for 2019 is expected to be 1.3-1.4 million ounces.

 

 

 

(1) Platinum, palladium, rhodium and gold.
 

IRON ORE

Financial and operational metrics

 

 

Production

volume

Sales

volume

Price

Unit

 cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying EBITDA margin

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

ROCE*

 

Mt(1)

Mt

$/t(2)

$/t(3)

$m

$m

 

$m

$m

 

Iron Ore

-

-

-

-

3,768

1,177

31%

747

415

3%

 Prior year

-

-

-

-

4,891

1,828

37%

1,500

252

15%

Kumba Iron Ore

43.1

43.3

72

32

3,440

1,544

45%

1,213

309

42%

 Prior year

45.0

44.9

71

31

3,486

1,474

42%

1,246

229

47%

Iron Ore Brazil (Minas-Rio)

3.4

3.2

70

-

328

(272)

-

(371)

106

(9)%

 Prior year

16.8

16.5

65

30

1,405

435

31%

335

23

6%

Projects and corporate

-

-

-

-

-

(95)

-

(95)

-

-

 Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

(81)

-

(81)

-

-

 

(1)  Minas-Rio production is Mt (wet basis).

(2)    Prices for Kumba Iron Ore are the average realised export basket price (FOB Saldanha). Prices for Minas-Rio are the average realised export basket price (FOB Açu) (wet basis).

(3)    Unit costs for Kumba Iron Ore are on an FOB dry basis. Unit costs for Minas-Rio are not disclosed for 2018, due to the suspension of operations; 2017 unit costs are on an FOB wet basis.

 

Financial and operational overview

Kumba

Underlying EBITDA increased by 5% to $1,544 million (2017: $1,474 million), mainly driven by a $1/tonne increase in the average realised iron ore price, partly offset by a 4% decrease in export sales volumes and a 3% increase in FOB unit costs. The increase in unit costs was driven by lower production, higher strip ratios and higher fuel costs, largely offset by operational efficiencies and cost-saving initiatives.

 

Sales volumes decreased by 4% to 43.3 Mt (2017: 44.9 Mt) owing to the impact of third-party rail constraints and single loading of vessels resulting from the scheduled refurbishment of the shiploader by Transnet at Saldanha Port in the second half of 2018. Consequently, total finished stock held at the mines and port increased to 5.3 Mt (2017: 4.3 Mt).

 

Minas-Rio

Minas-Rio recorded an underlying EBITDA loss of $272 million (2017: $435 million gain), reflecting the suspension of operations from March 2018, following the two leaks in the 529 kilometre iron ore pipeline from the mine to the Port of Açu.

 

Markets

 

2018

2017

Average market price (IODEX 62% Fe CFR China - $/tonne)

69

71

Average market price (MB 66% Fe Concentrate CFR - $/tonne)

95

87

Average realised price (Kumba export - $/tonne) (FOB Saldanha)

72

71

Average realised price (Minas-Rio - $/tonne) (FOB wet basis)

70

65

 

Kumba's outperformance over the IODEX (Platts) 62% Fe CFR China index was primarily due to the higher iron (Fe) content and the relatively high proportion (approximately 68%) of lump in the overall product portfolio.

 

Minas-Rio also produces higher grade products (higher iron content and lower gangue) than the reference product used for the IODEX 62% Fe CFR China index. IODEX 62% is referred to for comparison purposes only.

 

Operational performance

Kumba

Total production decreased by 4% to 43.1 Mt (2017: 45.0 Mt), in response to higher stock levels arising from Transnet's rail constraints. Production volumes were also affected by a small decrease in processing plant yields as Kumba focused on producing high quality products to maximise the value of tonnes railed to port and benefit from the strong demand for premium, high grade ore.

 

In line with its strategy, production at Sishen reduced by 6% to 29.2 Mt (2017: 31.1 Mt), while output at Kolomela remained constant at 13.9 Mt. Waste stripping at Sishen increased by 13% to 182.1 Mt (2017: 161.7 Mt), with continued improvements in efficiencies through increased primary mining equipment productivity. Consistent production performance at Kolomela led to a 1% increase in waste stripping to 56.0 Mt (2017: 55.6 Mt).

 

Minas-Rio

Production decreased by 80% to 3.4 Mt (2017: 16.8 Mt) following the suspension of operations since March 2018. The resumption of the operations occurred following the receipt of the appropriate regulatory approvals on 20 December, and an extensive and detailed technical inspection and the precautionary replacement of certain sections of the pipeline.

 

Operational outlook

Kumba

Kumba's production guidance for 2019 is 43-44 Mt, with waste movement for Sishen and Kolomela expected to be 170-180 Mt and 55-60 Mt, respectively.

 

Minas-Rio

A key regulatory approval relating to the Minas-Rio Step 3 licence area was granted on 21 December 2018, providing greater operational flexibility and access to higher grade iron ore to support the increase of production towards the full design capacity of 26.5 Mtpa. As a result, 2019 production guidance for Minas-Rio was increased to 18-20 Mt (previously 16-19 Mt). In addition, 2019 unit cost guidance was reduced to $28‑31/tonne (previously $30-33/tonne). Construction is under way for the next tailings dam lift and we expect to be ready for the normal process of conversion of the installation licence to an operating licence in the second quarter of 2019.

 

Legal

Sishen consolidated mining right granted

Sishen's application to extend the mining right area to include the Dingleton properties through the inclusion of the adjacent Prospecting Rights was granted on 25 June 2017 and notarially executed on 29 June 2018. The grant allows Sishen mine to expand its current mining operations within the adjacent Dingleton area.

 

Kolomela consolidated mining right granted

The Section 102 application to amend the Kolomela mining right and the mining work programme to include Heuningkranz and portion 1 of Langverwacht was granted on 14 October 2018. The environmental authorisation was approved on 7 November 2018. The grant allows Kolomela mine to expand its current mining operations within the adjacent Heuningkranz area.

 

The transfer of Thabazimbi to ArcelorMittal SA

Sishen Iron Ore Company Proprietary Limited (SIOC) and ArcelorMittal SA entered into an agreement in 2016 to transfer Thabazimbi mine to ArcelorMittal SA, subject to the fulfilment of certain conditions precedent. On 12 October 2018, Kumba and ArcelorMittal South Africa announced that all the conditions precedent to the transfer of Thabazimbi mine, together with the mining rights, had either been fulfilled or waived. The employees, assets and liabilities, as well as the mining rights and the assumed liabilities of the mine, were transferred at a nominal purchase consideration from SIOC to Thabazimbi Iron Ore Mine (Pty) Ltd, a wholly‑owned subsidiary of ArcelorMittal South Africa, previously ArcelorMittal South Africa Operations (Pty) Ltd, on 1 November 2018.
 

COAL

Financial and operational metrics

 

Production

volume

Sales

volume

Price

Unit

cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying

 EBITDA

 margin(5)

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

ROCE*

 

Mt(1)

Mt(2)

$/t(3)

$/t(4)

$m

$m

 

$m

$m

 

Coal

50.4

50.4

-

-

7,788

3,196

46%

2,538

722

67%

Prior year

48.9

49.0

-

-

7,211

2,868

46%

2,274

568

67%

Metallurgical Coal

21.8

22.0

190

64

4,231

2,210

52%

1,774

574

80%

Prior year

19.7

19.8

185

61

3,675

1,977

54%

1,594

416

86%

Thermal Coal -  South Africa

18.4

18.3

87

44

2,719

695

37%

566

148

68%

Prior year

18.6

18.6

76

44

2,746

588

32%

466

152

54%

Thermal Coal - Colombia

10.2

10.1

83

36

838

388

46%

295

-

35%

Prior year

10.6

10.6

75

31

790

385

49%

296

-

35%

Projects and corporate

-

-

-

-

-

(97)

-

(97)

-

-

Prior year

-

-

-

-

-

(82)

-

(82)

-

-

 

(1)   Production volumes are saleable tonnes. South African production volumes include export primary production, secondary production sold into export markets and production sold domestically at export parity pricing and excludes Eskom-tied operations production of 2.8 Mt (2017: 23.9 Mt) and other domestic production of 10.9 Mt (2017: 7.5 Mt). Metallurgical Coal production volumes exclude thermal coal production of 1.4 Mt (2017: 1.6 Mt).

(2)    South African sales volumes include export primary production, secondary production sold into export markets and production sold domestically at export parity pricing and exclude domestic sales of 10.3 Mt (2017: 8.2 Mt), Eskom-tied operations sales of 2.8 Mt (2017: 23.9 Mt) and non-equity traded sales of 9.5 Mt (2017: 7.6 Mt). Metallurgical Coal sales volumes exclude thermal coal sales of 1.6 Mt (2017: 1.8 Mt).

(3)    Metallurgical Coal realised price is the weighted average hard coking coal and PCI sales price achieved. Thermal Coal - South Africa realised price is the weighted average export thermal coal price achieved. Excludes third-party sales.

(4)  FOB cost per saleable tonne, excluding royalties. Metallurgical Coal excludes study costs. Thermal Coal - South Africa unit cost is for the trade operations.

(5)  Excludes impact of third-party sales and Eskom-tied operations.

 

Financial and operational overview

Metallurgical Coal

Underlying EBITDA increased by 12% to $2,210 million (2017: $1,977 million), owing to an 11% increase in sales volumes and a 3% improvement in the realised price for metallurgical coal. US dollar unit costs increased by 5% to $64/tonne (2017: $61/tonne), as a result of establishing new mining areas to achieve further productivity improvements, the impact of additional longwall moves and cost inflation.

 

Thermal Coal - South Africa

Underlying EBITDA increased by 18% to $695 million (2017: $588 million), driven by a 14% increase in the realised export thermal coal price. Export sales decreased by 2% to 18.3 Mt (2017: 18.6 Mt), while domestic sales increased by 26% to 10.3 Mt (2017: 8.2 Mt). US dollar unit costs for the export trade were in line with the prior year at $44/tonne as productivity improvements and cost savings offset the 8% inflation impact.

 

The sale of the Eskom-tied domestic thermal coal operations, comprising New Vaal, New Denmark, and Kriel

collieries, as well as four closed collieries, to Seriti Resources was completed on 1 March 2018. Production from these assets, until the date of completion, was 2.8 Mt.

 

Thermal Coal - Colombia

Underlying EBITDA increased marginally to $388 million (2017: $385 million), with an 11% increase in prices offsetting lower volumes arising from permitting delays and weather impacts in the fourth quarter.

 

 

Markets

Metallurgical coal

 

2018

2017

Average market price for premium low-volatile hard coking coal ($/tonne)(1)

207

188

Average market price for premium low-volatile PCI ($/tonne)(1)

136

119

Average realised price for premium low-volatile hard coking coal ($/tonne)

194

187

Average realised price for PCI ($/tonne)

128

125

 

(1)   Represents average spot prices.

 

Average realised prices differ from the average market price owing to differences in material grade and timing

of contracts.

 

Market prices in 2018 were supported by strong steelmaking margins globally and a number of supply disruptions in Australia.

 

Thermal coal

 

2018

2017

Average market price ($/tonne, FOB Australia)

107

89

Average market price ($/tonne, FOB South Africa)

98

84

Average market price ($/tonne, FOB Colombia)

85

78

Average realised price - Export Australia ($/tonne, FOB)

103

91

Average realised price - Export South Africa ($/tonne, FOB)

87

76

Average realised price - Domestic South Africa ($/tonne)

19

21

Average realised price - Colombia ($/tonne, FOB)

83

75

 

The average realised price for export thermal coal was 89% of the average market price due to timing and quality differences relative to the industry benchmark. The difference in the realised price compared with the market price, between 2017 and 2018, reflects a changing quality mix owing to a higher proportion of secondary products being sold into the export market.

 

Solid demand from South Korea and Japan underpinned the prices for higher energy coals in the Pacific region. Various supply issues in Australia also affected the availability of these higher energy coals. Chinese import demand decreased in the second half of the year as domestic stocks were rebuilt and a rebound in supply from Indonesia and South Africa increased the discounts for lower energy material.

 

Operational performance

Metallurgical Coal

Total production increased by 11% to 21.8 Mt, largely driven by higher production from the underground longwall operations which increased by 15% to 14.2 Mt (2017: 12.3 Mt). The increase was driven by sustained strong performance at Moranbah, which improved on its previous record and produced 6.8 Mt; and Grosvenor, which increased output to 3.8 Mt. Grasstree's production decreased by 25% to 3.6 Mt, marginally above planned volumes, as the operation moved into more challenging areas of the mine as it nears its end of life and undertook an additional longwall move in the year.

 

 

Thermal Coal - South Africa

Export production decreased by 1% to 18.4 Mt (2017: 18.6 Mt) as operations continued to transition between mining areas. Total production from the Export mines increased by 12% to 24.6 Mt (2017: 22.0 Mt), driven by productivity-led growth from the underground operations. Total output benefited as market prices allowed the processing of mineral residue deposits (MRD), which generates earnings and avoids capital expenditure for the MRD expansions, as well as helping to mitigate future rehabilitation costs. MRD production can be sold either into the domestic or export markets.

 

Thermal Coal - Colombia

Anglo American's attributable production from its 33.3% ownership of Cerrejón decreased by 4% to 10.2 Mt (2017: 10.6 Mt).

 

Operational outlook

Metallurgical coal

Full year 2019 production guidance for metallurgical coal is 22-24 Mt.

 

Export thermal coal

Full year 2019 production guidance for export thermal coal is 26-28 Mt.

 

 

NICKEL AND MANGANESE

Financial and operational metrics

 

Production

volume

Sales

volume

Price

Unit

cost*

Group revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying EBITDA margin

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

  ROCE*              

 

t(1)

t(1)

c/lb(2)

c/lb(3)

$m

$m(3)

 

$m(4)

$m

 

Nickel and Manganese

-

-

-

-

1,707

844

49%

685

38

28%

 

Prior year

-

-

-

-

1,391

610

44%

478

28

20%

 

Nickel

42,300

43,100

588

361

560

181

32%

75

38

4%

 

Prior year

43,800

43,000

476

365

451

81

18%

0

28

0%

 

Samancor(5)

3.8

3.7

-

-

1,147

663

58%

610

-

159%

 

Prior year

3.6

3.6

-

-

940

529

56%

478

-

115%

 

                           

 

(1)  Nickel production and sales are tonnes (t). Samancor production and sales are million tonnes (Mt).

(2)  Realised price

(3)  C1 unit cost.

(4)  Nickel segment includes $8 million projects and corporate costs (2017: $8 million).

(5)    Production, sales and financials include ore and alloy.

 

Financial and operational overview

Nickel

Underlying EBITDA increased by 123% to $181 million (2017: $81 million), primarily reflecting the higher nickel price.

 

Nickel unit costs decreased by 1% to 361 c/lb (2017: 365 c/lb), despite lower production, driven by improved operational stability and the effect of favourable exchange rates, partly offset by higher energy prices.

 

Samancor

Underlying EBITDA increased by 25% to $663 million (2017: $529 million), driven mainly by the continued improvement in manganese ore prices.

 

Markets

Nickel

 

2018

2017

Average market price (c/lb)

595

472

Average realised price (c/lb)

588

476

 

The average market price is the LME nickel price, from which ferronickel pricing is derived. Ferronickel is traded based on discounts or premiums to the LME price, depending on market conditions, supplier products and consumer preferences. Differences between market prices and realised prices are largely due to variances between the LME and the ferronickel price.

 

The nickel price increased by 26% to an average of 595 c/lb in 2018, with strong demand growth maintaining the market deficit. In the second half of the year, however, prices came under pressure from macro-economic worries, including heightening trade war concerns. Stainless steel production (around 70% of nickel demand) increased to record levels in 2018, while nickel consumption in batteries increased by more than 30%, as demand for zero emission vehicles and lithium-ion based energy storage continued to accelerate.

 

 

Samancor

The average 2018 benchmark manganese ore price (Metal Bulletin 44% manganese ore CIF China) increased by 23% to $7.24/dmtu (2017: $5.91/dmtu) due to continuing strong demand from China's steel manufacturing sector.

 

Operational performance

Nickel

Nickel output decreased by 3% to 42,300 tonnes (2017: 43,800 tonnes) owing to a 40-day planned maintenance stoppage at Barro Alto in the first half of 2018. Barro Alto produced 33,500 tonnes (2017: 34,900 tonnes), while Codemin produced 8,800 tonnes (2017: 8,900 tonnes).

 

Samancor

Attributable manganese ore production increased by 3% to 3.6 Mt (2017: 3.5 Mt). Production from the Australian operations increased by 10% due to improved concentrator availability, the effect of more favourable weather conditions and increased premium concentrate ore (PC02) production. Ore production from the South African operations decreased by 6% as an increase in higher quality premium material was more than offset by a decline in fine grained secondary products.

 

Attributable production of manganese alloys increased by 5% to 157,000 tonnes (2017: 149,000 tonnes), mainly as a result of improved furnace stability at the Australian operations for the majority of the year. In South Africa, manganese alloy production improved by 6% while continuing to utilise only one of the operation's four furnaces.

 

Operational outlook

Nickel

Production guidance for 2019 is 42,000-44,000 tonnes.

 

 

CORPORATE AND OTHER

Financial metrics

 

Group

revenue*

Underlying

EBITDA*

Underlying

EBIT*

Capex*

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

Segment

3

(219)

(226)

27

Prior year

5

(292)

(313)

9

Exploration

-

(113)

(113)

-

Prior year

-

(103)

(103)

-

3

(106)

(113)

27

Prior year

5

(189)

(210)

9

 

Financial overview

Corporate and other reported an underlying EBITDA loss of $219 million (2017: $292 million loss).

 

Exploration

Exploration's underlying EBITDA loss increased to $113 million (2017: $103 million loss), reflecting increased exploration activities across most product groups, but predominantly in diamonds.

 

Corporate activities and unallocated costs

Underlying EBITDA amounted to a $106 million loss (2017: $189 million loss), driven primarily by a year‑on‑year gain recognised in the Group's self-insurance entity, reflecting lower net claims and settlements during 2018, as well as higher premium income.

 

For further information, please contact:

 

Media

 

Investors

UK

James Wyatt-Tilby

james.wyatt-tilby@angloamerican.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7968 8759

 

UK

Paul Galloway

paul.galloway@angloamerican.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7968 8718

 

Marcelo Esquivel

marcelo.esquivel@angloamerican.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7968 8891

 

 

Robert Greenberg

robert.greenberg@angloamerican.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7968 2124

South Africa

Pranill Ramchander

pranill.ramchander@angloamerican.com

Tel: +27 (0)11 638 2592

 

Ann Farndell

ann.farndell@angloamerican.com

Tel: +27 (0)11 638 2786

 

Emma Waterworth

emma.waterworth@angloamerican.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7968 8574

 

 

Notes to editors:

Anglo American is a global diversified mining business and our products are the essential ingredients in almost every aspect of modern life. Our portfolio of world-class competitive mining operations and undeveloped resources provides the metals and minerals to meet the growing consumer-driven demands of the world's developed and maturing economies. With our people at the heart of our business, we use innovative practices and the latest technologies to discover new resources and mine, process, move and market our products to our customers around the world.

 

As a responsible miner - of diamonds (through De Beers), copper, platinum and other precious metals, iron ore, coal and nickel - we are the custodians of what are precious natural resources. We work together with our key partners and stakeholders to unlock the sustainable value that those resources represent for our shareholders, the communities and countries in which we operate and for society at large. Anglo American is re-imagining mining to improve people's lives.

www.angloamerican.com

 

     

 

 

Webcast of presentation: 

A live webcast of the results presentation, starting at 9.00am UK time on 21 February 2019, can be accessed through the Anglo American website at www.angloamerican.com

 

Note: Throughout this results announcement, '$' denotes United States dollars and 'cents' refers to United States cents. Tonnes are metric tons, 'Mt' denotes million tonnes and 'kt' denotes thousand tonnes, unless otherwise stated.

 

 

Forward-looking statements:                            

This announcement includes forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts included in this announcement, including, without limitation, those regarding Anglo American's financial position, business, acquisition and divestment strategy, dividend policy, plans and objectives of management for future operations (including development plans and objectives relating to Anglo American's products, production forecasts and Ore Reserves and Mineral Resource estimates), are forward-looking statements. By their nature, such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Anglo American, or industry results, to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are based on numerous assumptions regarding Anglo American's present and future business strategies and the environment in which Anglo American will operate in the future. Important factors that could cause Anglo American's actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, among others, levels of actual production during any period, levels of global demand and commodity market prices, mineral resource exploration and development capabilities, recovery rates and other operational capabilities, the availability of mining and processing equipment, the ability to produce and transport products profitably, the availability of transportation infrastructure, the impact of foreign currency exchange rates on market prices and operating costs, the availability of sufficient credit, the effects of inflation, political uncertainty and economic conditions in relevant areas of the world, the actions of competitors, activities by governmental authorities such as permitting and changes in taxation or safety, health, environmental or other types of regulation in the countries where Anglo American operates, conflicts over land and resource ownership rights and such other risk factors identified in Anglo American's most recent Annual Report. Forward-looking statements should, therefore, be construed in light of such risk factors and undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this announcement. Anglo American expressly disclaims any obligation or undertaking (except as required by applicable law, the City Code on Takeovers and Mergers (the "Takeover Code"), the UK Listing Rules, the Disclosure and Transparency Rules of the Financial Conduct Authority, the Listings Requirements of the securities exchange of the JSE Limited in South Africa, the SIX Swiss Exchange, the Botswana Stock Exchange and the Namibian Stock Exchange and any other applicable regulations) to release publicly any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statement contained herein to reflect any change in Anglo American's expectations with regard thereto or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is based.

 

Nothing in this announcement should be interpreted to mean that future earnings per share of Anglo American will necessarily match or exceed its historical published earnings per share.

 

Certain statistical and other information about Anglo American included in this announcement is sourced from publicly available third-party sources. As such, it has not been independently verified and presents the views of those third parties, though these may not necessarily correspond to the views held by Anglo American and Anglo American expressly disclaims any responsibility for, or liability in respect of, such third-party information.

 

 

Anglo American plc

20 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AN United Kingdom 

Registered office as above. Incorporated in England and Wales under the Companies Act 1985.

Registered Number: 3564138 Legal Entity Identifier: 549300S9XF92D1X8ME43

 


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Anglo American Preliminary Results 2018 - RNS